cyborg


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cyborg

(CYBernetic ORGanism) A being that is part human and part machine. The term was coined in 1960 by Manfred Clynes and Nathan Kline in an article they wrote about how humans can survive in space. For centuries, various cultures have fantasized about half human-half artificial beings; however, in the 20th century this concept materialized in the form of artificial limbs, pacemakers and other bionic devices. See lifecasting, Borg, cybernetics and bionic.
References in periodicals archive ?
(10) Like the cosmetic surgery craze today, the very production of a cyborg does not correct a physical, psychological, or socio-political crisis but becomes the medicalization of an unacceptable "normalcy" brought on by gender-specific ageing and behavior.
"I don't think there's any peace between me and Cyborg. Whether you like me or you don't like me, whatever your opinion is it doesn't matter."
"My trans-species identity started long before becoming a cyborg," he says.
It isn't virtual or augmented reality, it is reality that already exists but my human body cannot reveal or sense," the Catalan-raised, British-born cyborg artist said.
Harbisson, who was in Dubai to attend the World Government Summit, was recognised as the world's first cyborg in 2004, and has since become the co-founder of the Cyborg Foundation - an international organisation that defends cyborg rights, promotes cyborg art and supports people who want to become cyborgs.
ELIZABETH HOOVER You begin Unbearable Splendor with a long quote from Donna Haraway's "A Cyborg Manifesto" that starts, "The cyborg is resolutely committed to partially, irony, intimacy, and perversity." The other epigraph is a short line from Blade Runner: "I've seen things you people wouldn't believe." How are you hoping these quotes set up the book for your reader?
On camera, the participants talk about Memphis and King, as well as the stand-up comedy scene and the cyborg. At times, Reynaud-Dewar is heard questioning her subjects, who often appear on-screen as just noses and mouths, their eyes out of the frame.
During the manual training, the trainer has to keep watching the rat cyborg and send the control commands of electrical stimuli repeatedly.
Thereby, while previous generation of feminists like radical, cultural, socialist identified technological pessimism, these new generation feminists like TechnoFeminists, Cyberfeminists and Cyborg Feminists identify technological optimist feminism.
An alternative anthropological approach, which was also initially developed in California's information technological mecca, conceives the person as a "cyborg" (short for cybernetic organism, a hybrid of machine and organism).
Neil Harbisson was born completely colorblind, but the British artist and "cyborg activist" has since had an antenna implanted in his skull that allows him to "see" colors via sound waves.