cyclic element

cyclic element

[′sīk·lik ′el·ə·mənt]
(industrial engineering)
An element of an operation or process that occurs in each of its cycles.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The business level is very good in the Middle East but there is a cyclic element to it.
Then G is nilpotent if and only if every minimal subgroup < x > of K lies in the hypercenter [Z.sub.[infinity]] (G) of G and every cyclic element of P with order 4 is c-normal in G.
The last two measures repeat a short octave figure introduced earlier that will recur in the last song, providing a cyclic element.
Obviously, more fragments will be possible when their lengths are shortest; and the shortest possible fragments--single pcs--can be extracted from a cycle in the greatest number by simply taking every other cyclic element. A maximally fragmented n-cycle, then, would contain On, 2n, 4n, and so on, as far as the cycle permits.
Take d = [e.sup.[perpendicular]], thus d is a cyclic element of Q.
This show [e.sup.[perpendicular]] is a cyclic element in Q.
Schwarzkopf offers "Recycled Wheels." It explores the cyclic elements of "sound wheels" made up of tri-chords, clusters of tones and re cycling melodic lines that he describes as "variations la Brahms-meets-avant-garde jazz improvisation." CONCERT PREVIEW Cascadia Composers When: 7:30 p.m.
Pierrot's "lack" of large-scale structure is not a failing, but rather a historical characteristic of the work, and one that provided Schoenberg opportunities for ironic uses of cyclic elements.
This perspective may not take into sufficient account Schubert's turn to large-scale multi-movement instrumental works in 1824 that have demonstrable cyclic elements, a turn that was as sudden as that in 1822, and that the composer int ended as preparation for a new symphony designed to be a part of a concert like the one Beethoven was to give that year.
2, he offers a cyclic interpretation of tonality and points out the tension that exists between tonal and cyclic elements, namely, the whole-tone collections and quartal harmonies.
The younger group (Hebelt, Paris, Hafeneder, Scheicher) left modern symphonies and often generically mixed it up with the popular Salzburg tradition of serenade from which they borrowed certain orchestral effects and cyclic elements. Noticeably absent from the volume is the concerto, even though it is evident from the documents cited in the preface that it was important in the output of some of these composers (Seidl and L.