Cyme

(redirected from cymes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

Cyme

(sī`mē), ancient Greek city of W Asia Minor, on the Ionian Sea and N of the present Smyrna in W Asian Turkey. It was the largest and most important of the 12 cities of Aeolis. In the late 5th cent. B.C., Cyme struggled to be free of Persian domination but was only intermittently successful. Later it was a city of the Seleucids and ultimately of Rome.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cyme

 

an inflorescence in the course of whose development each axis terminates in a flower and ceases to grow early. The lateral axes, that is, the branches of the inflorescence, outgrow the cyme. There may be a single lateral axis (monochasium), two lateral axes (dichasium), or more than two lateral axes (pleiochasium), all of which terminate in a flower.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

cyme

[sīm]
(botany)
An inflorescence in which each main axis terminates in a single flower; secondary and tertiary axes may also have flowers, but with shorter flower stalks.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cyme

an inflorescence in which the first flower is the terminal bud of the main stem and subsequent flowers develop as terminal buds of lateral stems
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
His now almost forgotten book was a "mine of information," Cymes said.
Some 35 licenses include DVDs and Soleil-published comics, Cymes says.
The authors looked at three inflorescence structures that occur in nature: the panicle, the raceme, and the cyme. They compared these to theoretical structures that don't exist, and from this information attempted to come up with a model with an evolutionary perspective about how the existing types could be related to each other through genetic change.
Bugle-shaped (funnel-shaped) appearing as a single flower or in small cymes. Flowers in late winter or early spring.
Unique Characteristics: Stem is slender and leafless with salverform flowers in panicle-like cymes.
At that time several plants had basal leaves and one plant retained an inflorescence in which the panicle of cymes had begun to deteriorate.
Differences in both pistillate and staminate cymes and flowers were documented and compared across all genera of Betulaceae.
Close morphological study revealed that both flower perianths, staminate (campanulate) and pistillate (urceollate), as well the inflorescences in headlike cymes, show affinity with Pisonia.
Flowers occur in inflorescences of 2-4 (Jepson 1993) scorpioid cymes and contain 5, partially-fused petals that form a star-shaped, 3-6 mm-broad white corolla (Munz 1974).