Cyme

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Cyme

(sī`mē), ancient Greek city of W Asia Minor, on the Ionian Sea and N of the present Smyrna in W Asian Turkey. It was the largest and most important of the 12 cities of Aeolis. In the late 5th cent. B.C., Cyme struggled to be free of Persian domination but was only intermittently successful. Later it was a city of the Seleucids and ultimately of Rome.

Cyme

 

an inflorescence in the course of whose development each axis terminates in a flower and ceases to grow early. The lateral axes, that is, the branches of the inflorescence, outgrow the cyme. There may be a single lateral axis (monochasium), two lateral axes (dichasium), or more than two lateral axes (pleiochasium), all of which terminate in a flower.

cyme

[sīm]
(botany)
An inflorescence in which each main axis terminates in a single flower; secondary and tertiary axes may also have flowers, but with shorter flower stalks.

cyme

an inflorescence in which the first flower is the terminal bud of the main stem and subsequent flowers develop as terminal buds of lateral stems
References in periodicals archive ?
From 1933 onwards when Hitler came to power, medical ethics "were turned upside down," Cymes said.
sectio Sargassum Leaves and vesicles well differentiated, leaves not retroflex at basis; receptacles usually compound, cylindrical, smooth, arranged in cymes or racemes.
FLOWER DESCRIPTION: 2" to 8" wide, borne solitary or in cymes of 2 or 3, many shades of white, pink, red, blue, lavender, or violet.
This simple inflorescence is a common unit that when repeated produces other more complex branching patterns called both compound cymes and compound dichasia (see Figure 9-11).
Branching from the prohylls, cymes may become even more complex, to the extent that some genera show a varying number of fertile flowers and sterile flowers (Fig.
bodinieri--A large shrub with violet fruits in dense cymes, arising from leaf axils.
Description: Tiny, waxy, orange flowers appear in rounded, umbellate cyme clusters.
In January, it produces cymes of white flowers with a tint of rose to lighten up a dark winter's day.
Capitulescences monocephalous or in cymes, terminal; capitula short-petiolate, homogamous, discoid; receptacle epaleate, alveolate; involucre multiseriate.
FLOWER DESCRIPTION: White to pink (pink in bud), appearing in 3" cymes in late winter to early spring.
FLOWER DESCRIPTION: Yellow, sometimes reddish, 4-petaled, 1/2" long and strap-like, appearing in axillary cymes.
In Gesneriaceae, pair-flowered partial florescences terminating each cyme are characteristic (Weber, 1973), but transitions to "normal" cymes have also been found (Weber, 1978).