cynic


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Related to cynic: skeptic

cynic

Astronomy of or relating to Sirius, the Dog Star

Cynic

a member of a sect founded by Antisthenes that scorned worldly things and held that self-control was the key to the only good
References in classic literature ?
"This more reverent title had previously been forced upon him by the religious scruples of the last newspaper in which a part of the work had appeared, with the natural consequence that when it came out in covers the country already had been flooded by its imitators with a score of 'cynic' books -- The Cynic's This , The Cynic's That , and
"I don't know if I have or not," replied the Cynic, "for you have the world."
Though Thackeray is no cynic he is a satirist as much as Pope or Dryden, but the most kindly satirist who ever wrote.
"The Great Carbuncle!" answered the Cynic, with ineffable scorn.
'The Great Carbuncle!' answered the Cynic, with ineffable scorn.
"For a red rose?" they cried; "how very ridiculous!" and the little Lizard, who was something of a cynic, laughed outright.
What is a cynic? [Sitting on the back of the sofa.]
* To show the tenor of thought, the following definition is quoted from "The Cynic's Word Book" (1906 A.D.), written by one Ambrose Bierce, an avowed and confirmed misanthrope of the period: "Grapeshot, n.
what a cynic you are!" cried the old lady, pushing back her chair and nodding to Lady Ruxton.
As I brought the boat under the falls my captain, in high good- humour, leaned over, spreading his red and freckled elbows on the rail, and called down to me sarcastically, out of the depths of his cynic philosopher's beard:
To the insular cynic and the insular moralist they offer an equal opportunity.
The times were very much changed since the period when she drove to Mudbury in the spring-cart and called the small tradesmen "Sir." It may have been shame, or it may have been dislike of his neighbours, but the old Cynic of Queen's Crawley hardly issued from his park- gates at all now.