Lymphangioma

(redirected from cystic lymphangioma)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

lymphangioma

[‚lim‚fan·jē′ō·mə]
(medicine)
An abnormal mass of lymphatic vessels.

Lymphangioma

 

a tumor of the lymphatic vessels.

Most lymphangiomas represent defects of development. They may be localized in any part of the body and its organs and tissues, but they are found most often in the neck, skin, subcutaneous connective tissue, or retroperitoneal space (less frequently, in the liver, spleen, or kidneys). They appear as soft swellings of various dimensions in the skin or subcutaneous tissue and seem to disappear when pressed. Lymphangiomas grow slowly. They become inflamed readily. Treatment is surgical.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Cystic lymphangioma of the gall-bladder: A case report.
Although a rare, cystic lymphangiomas must be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic lesions in neck of adult.
2-5 Adrenal cystic lymphangiomas are rare benign vascular lesions and are thought to arise from the abnormal development and/or ectasia of lymphatic vessels or from blockage of proximal lymphatics or trauma.
Treatment of cystic lymphangioma by intralesional bleomycin injection: Experience of 70 patients.
Sato K, Maekawa T, Yabuki K, et al: Cystic lymphangiomas of the colon, Gastroenterology 1999; 34:520-524
The differential diagnosis of cervical thymic cyst in adults includes branchial cleft cyst, cystic lymphangioma, cervical bronchogenic cyst, and cystic metastasis of the lymph nodes.
1,2) Two recent patients with a history of scrotal trauma and an enlarged hemiscrotum were unique; one boy was found to have bleeding from incarcerated omentum in an indirect inguinal hernia, while the other had bleeding into a cystic lymphangioma.
5 & 6) revealed dilated lymphatic spaces lined by endothelial cells containing clear fluid with few lymphocytes-features suggestive of cystic lymphangioma.
Kennedy et al, in their large, retrospective review of 46 patients with cystic lymphangioma, found four possible cases with acquired causes.
6) The differential diagnosis of an abdominal cystic mass includes mesenteric cyst, duplication cyst, pancreatic pseudocyst, lymphocele, seroma, cystic lymphangioma, mesenteric abscess, benign cystic teratoma, and cystic spindle cell tumor.
7) The differential diagnosis of well-marginated pericecal cystic lesions on computed tomographic scan includes mesenteric cysts (including cystic lymphangioma and mesothelial cyst), lymphatic cyst, appendiceal mucocele, nonpancreatic pseudocyst, enteric duplication, epidermoid cyst, and cystic teratoma (9) (Table).