cytotechnologist

(redirected from cytotechnology)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.

cytotechnologist

[‚sīd·ō‚tek′näl·ə·jəst]
(pathology)
A person trained to prepare smears of and examine exfoliated cells, referring abnormalities to a physician.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kenyan laboratory technologists are trained in gynecologic cytology at the Loma Linda University (Loma Linda, California) School of Allied Health Professions' cytotechnology program.
Various informants lamented the absence of a cytotechnology training programme, which one informant mentioned used to exist, and a few espoused its recreation.
(19), (20) Recent improvements in SCA include advances in argon- and helium-based cytotechnology and the development of small-caliber cryoablation probes, pinpoint thermocouples, effective urethral warming devices, and software packages that facilitate optimal placement of cryoablation probes and thermocouples.
Now, those certified in other clinical laboratory disciplines (medical technology, cytotechnology) or even subspecialties (microbiology and blood banking, etc) can sit for the molecular exam with only minimal training in molecular biology within their existing clinical internship.
[4] Buntemeyer, H., Wallerius, C., and Lehmann, J., 1992, "Optimal medium use for continuous high-density perfusion processes," Cytotechnology, 9, pp.5967.
Also moving into MIF #3 are the Interservice Cytotechnology Program and the Interservice Histotechnology Program.
More than 1800 students are enrolled in the college's programs in dental hygiene, nursing, physical therapy, environmental health, nuclear medicine, cytotechnology, community and public health and medical technology.
Awareness of the Alabama Academy of Science was given to the Director of the Cytotechnology Program at Auburn University Montgomery (Sonya Griffin) in the hopes of adding yet another discipline to the Health Sciences Section.
She uses multiple ethnographic techniques and sites: most central are participant observation in a cytotechnology lab where amniotic fluid samples are processed for chromosomal information; interviews with hundreds of pregnant women considering or undergoing amniocentesis; attendance at events sponsored by disability rights activist groups and interviews with some of those activists; and observation of genetic counseling sessions.
Rapid improvements in cytotechnology and in information transmission capabilities should quickly lead to improved feasibility of single-visit programs for high-grade cervical lesions, Dr.