Czardas


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Czardas

 

a Hungarian folk dance performed by couples to 2/4 time. The czardas, which appeared in the mid-19th century, consists of one slow section and one fast, impetuous section. It has syncopated rhythms, and many steps are improvised. The czardas served as the basis of ballroom dance that became popular in Russia in the early 20th century as the vengerka. Musical reworkings of the czardas are found in Liszt’s Hungarian Rhapsodies, Brahms’ Hungarian Dances, Delibes’s Coppélia, and Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake.

References in periodicals archive ?
After playing the Capriccio but before playing the Czardas, Brookes leans back from the piano and tells his audience that he is performing a selection from his own new opera that consists of "only the movement" of an actress's "dress," a piece absurdly lacking in both strength and talent (95).
There was a serious side to the evening, too, with violinist Ruth Palmer playing Messenet's Meditation from Thais and Monti's Czardas superbly.
He also was an incredible dancer and could effortlessly cross a floor in a waltz, czardas or polka.
I asked her in the second act of 'Die Fledermaus' to dance part of the czardas.
Elaine, studying popular music and recording at Salford University, will be performing the Toy Soldier's March by Fritz Kreisler, Czardas by Vittorio Monti and her classical version of Michael Jackson's Smooth Criminal.
The choreography reflected the different culture of each destination where the violin emerged, from formal waltzes and gallops to passionate tangos and czardas - gypsy traditional Hungarian folk dances.
Philip, who has recorded with Mantovani and performed with Max Jaffa at Scarborough, will feature such favourites as Chanson de Martin, South Pacific, Monte's Czardas and Massenet's Meditation.
In the meantime, the pupil of Heart of England School in Balsall Common is perfecting her czardas, a character dance she will be performing in the production.
It is an obstinate Hungarian Gypsy, Fanny, who organizes the celebration; she rearranges the furniture, and teaches everyone in the cell to dance Hungarian czardas, while she sings along Gypsy folk-tunes.
The national dances, in which we look so faux, were riveting, because the dancers know how to perform a czardas, a mazurka, how to toss their heads and wear their gloves and slide a foot on the floor as if slitting open a letter with it.
At one point in Spewack's autobiography a czardas is heard from across the street, played in celebration of her mother's second marriage.
He enjoys gypsy music, rhapsodies, and czardas, also music by Liszt and the dreamy music of Grieg.