dado joint

dado joint

[′dā‚dō ‚jȯint]
(building construction)
A joint made by fitting the full thickness of the edge or the end of one board into a corresponding groove in another board. Also known as housed joint.

housed joint, dado joint

housed joint
A joint between two wood members, usually at right angles; the full thickness of the edge or end of one member is inserted in a corresponding housing in the other.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: The authors cut a dado joint into the staves to receive the tub floor.
We also cut 11/16-inch-deep dado joints at the bottom of the staves so they would slip onto the perimeter of the floor.
Statistical selection models showed that the optimal combination of factors based on the joint study was: dado joint, ethylene vinyl acetate adhesive, no staples, and room temperature conditions.
The three joint configurations included a face to edge dado joint, a face to edge butt joint, and an edge to edge butt joint as shown in Figure 1.
For the face to edge dado joint, the area was calculated as the cross-sectional area of the side member (1/2 by 4-1/2 in.
The results show that the face to edge dado joint had lower average values for all adhesive types than the face to edge and edge to edge butt joints.
All of the cabinets were constructed with a dado joint configuration, EVA adhesive, without the use of staples.
Cabinet C2 likely had better performance because of the dado joint that connected the side panel and the back rail.
From the present study, it can be concluded that using a dado joint to join the back panel to the side panels is the best method of construction for a cabinet.
In this type of failure, the part of the rail forming the dado joint separated from the side panel.
Designed by Holl and built by local cabinetry specialist Javier Gomez, it's the visual centerpiece of the interior, boasting smooth curves and handsome dado joints that keep its steeply angled shelves in place.
The 5-foot-long bench, which the intermediate woodworker can build in a weekend, is made all the more durable by using 4-by-4s for legs; 2-by lumber is used as horizontal boards that fit snugly in dado joints cut in the legs.