daemon

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daemon

[′dē·mən]
(computer science)
In Unix, a program that runs in the background, such as a server.

daemon

(operating system)
/day'mn/ or /dee'mn/ (From the mythological meaning, later rationalised as the acronym "Disk And Execution MONitor") A program that is not invoked explicitly, but lies dormant waiting for some condition(s) to occur. The idea is that the perpetrator of the condition need not be aware that a daemon is lurking (though often a program will commit an action only because it knows that it will implicitly invoke a daemon).

For example, under ITS writing a file on the LPT spooler's directory would invoke the spooling daemon, which would then print the file. The advantage is that programs wanting files printed need neither compete for access to, nor understand any idiosyncrasies of, the LPT. They simply enter their implicit requests and let the daemon decide what to do with them. Daemons are usually spawned automatically by the system, and may either live forever or be regenerated at intervals.

Unix systems run many daemons, chiefly to handle requests for services from other hosts on a network. Most of these are now started as required by a single real daemon, inetd, rather than running continuously. Examples are cron (local timed command execution), rshd (remote command execution), rlogind and telnetd (remote login), ftpd, nfsd (file transfer), lpd (printing).

Daemon and demon are often used interchangeably, but seem to have distinct connotations (see demon). The term "daemon" was introduced to computing by CTSS people (who pronounced it /dee'mon/) and used it to refer to what ITS called a dragon.

daemon

Pronounced "dee-mun" as in the word for devil, as well as "day-mun," a daemon is a Unix/Linux program that executes in the background ready to perform an operation when required. Functioning like an extension to the operating system, a daemon is usually an unattended process that is initiated at startup. Typical daemons are print spoolers and email handlers or a scheduler that starts up another process at a designated time. The term comes from Greek mythology, meaning "guardian spirit." See agent and mailer-daemon.
References in periodicals archive ?
He writes: Naturally, since Socrates has arguably never failed to heed a daemonic warning he has no direct, experiential evidence of the unbeneficial consequences that would have obtained had he not heeded it.
It is the felt that unifies the self as a conscious being; it includes features of the daemonic.
The first stage of the argument involves a lucid discussion of the idea of the daemonic in antiquity, focusing primarily on Plato and Aristotle: Nicholls's study is the first attempt to take seriously Goethe's assertion that his concept of the daemonic was modelled' after the ancients'.
America is much like a daemonic entity in Russian politics, a terrifying presence that animates policy from Moscow.
time-bound spiritual practice [which Kramer identifies with incarnation] overcomes the movement '[d]riven by daemonic, chthonic / Powers,' and through grace frees one from 'past and future' alike.
Thus in an eloquent final appreciation of "the beauty of genuine dualisms," Quinones accords to each man of consciousness the accolade of having "turned his face toward the future" along with his daemonic partner--but that is just what each of them was previously said not to have done or to have done ineffectively; it is precisely what distinguished him from his radical other.
Rather, Quinones writes about cross-rivalries, tensions between writers of consciousness, who believe in the power of reason and are suspicious of inspiration, and their antagonists, daemonic writers, who are open to the inner voice, to pressures coming from the marginal areas of experience.
Neither of the land nor of the sea, but possessing both the stability of the one and the constant flux of the other--too immense, too filled with the vastness of the outer, to carry any sense of human handicraft--this strange territory of the Docks seems, indeed, to form a kind of fifth element, a place charged with daemonic issues and daemonic silences, where men move like puzzled slaves, fretting under orders they cannot understand, fumbling with great forces that have long passed out of their control .
AARON VLASAK, "Concerning Philosophic Hyperbole: Plato's Daemonic Socrates.
The distinctive aspect of "in the heavenlies" (en tois epouraniois) in contrast to "the heavens" (ouranoi) as area in which the drama of encounter with the daemonic powers is enacted, is certain to invite readers' attention.
The article will then explore how real or historical and allegorical spaces and events reflect on a society; the role of the daemonic agent and its allegorical and real levels; and causality and magic as the links between the primary and secondary levels of meaning.
Klawiter had referred to "that primordial daemonic urge inherent in all men that serves positively to activate the individual when properly restrained; an urge, however, that utterly destroys its victim if once allowed to gain control .