daguerreotype

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daguerreotype

one of the earliest photographic processes, in which the image was produced on iodine-sensitized silver and developed in mercury vapour

Daguerreotype

 

the first commercially developed and widely used photographic process, now only of historical interest. The daguerreotype was invented in the 1830’s by L. J. Daguerre on the basis of experiments by N.Niepce. Information on the invention of the daguerreotype was made public in 1839, which is regarded as the year of the invention of photography.

daguerreotype

[də′ger·ə‚tīp]
(graphic arts)
A photograph produced on a silver plate or a copper plate coated with silver sensitized by the action of iodine; after exposure of the plate in a camera, a latent image is developed by use of mercury vapor.
References in periodicals archive ?
And he visited the daguerreotypist in Buffalo: `I have had my likeness taken and cased for $2 and shall send it to Sabrina .
Thus Hawthorne casts his vote for the energizing effects of a democratic, as opposed to an aristocratic, social system; he has Holgrave, the daguerreotypist, support this view with the comment that families should continually merge into the great mass of humanity, without regard to ancestry.
Further progress stemmed from the collaboration of John Adams Whipple, a studio daguerreotypist in Boston, and William Cranch Bond, a clockmaker by trade and first director of Harvard College Observatory.
Collett contrasts the painted portrait of Pyncheon and its concealment with "the movement toward truth and freedom" that is a result of daguerreotypy and of the daguerreotypist, Holgrave (221).
Fate has no happiness in store for you; unless your quiet home in the old family residence, with the faithful Hepzibah, and your long summer-afternoons with Phoebe, and these Sabbath festivals with Uncle Venner and the Daguerreotypist, deserve to be called happiness
Thomas, and Ann Wilsher among them, have focused on Hawthorne, arguing that The House of the Seven Gables (1851) and its daguerreotypist Holgrave represent one of the most important early literary engagements with photography.
The fine detail produced by the daguerreotype process could render exquisitely clear images, and the most adept daguerreotypists such as Jeremiah Gurney and Mathew Brady were able to command a premium for their images of the American elite.
50), the interpretation of this literary text is married cleverly to the philosophical and practical work of the period's leading daguerreotypists as well as to other mid-century responses to this new photographic technology.
Pioneer Photography in Bolivia: Register of Daguerreotypists and Photographers, 1840s-1930s.
The author also recenters Mexican photography into important debates on transculturation by exploring the relationships between Mexican and foreign photographers (from early French daguerreotypists like Theodore Tiffereau to American artist Edward Weston).
Washington is one of only a handful of African American daguerreotypists whose work, dating from the 1800s, has been identified and collected.