daguerreotype

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daguerreotype

one of the earliest photographic processes, in which the image was produced on iodine-sensitized silver and developed in mercury vapour

Daguerreotype

 

the first commercially developed and widely used photographic process, now only of historical interest. The daguerreotype was invented in the 1830’s by L. J. Daguerre on the basis of experiments by N.Niepce. Information on the invention of the daguerreotype was made public in 1839, which is regarded as the year of the invention of photography.

daguerreotype

[də′ger·ə‚tīp]
(graphic arts)
A photograph produced on a silver plate or a copper plate coated with silver sensitized by the action of iodine; after exposure of the plate in a camera, a latent image is developed by use of mercury vapor.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this way, daguerreotypy became an essential part of an emerging American national identity, and helped to set the stage for the coming mass communication boom at the turn of the twentieth century.
The same methodological approach is also at work in the second half of the book, which begins with a close reading of Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, works through a history of daguerreotypy in the African colonisation movement and ends with an examination of the influence of the daguerreotype image on the works and politics of Frederick Douglass.
Collett contrasts the painted portrait of Pyncheon and its concealment with "the movement toward truth and freedom" that is a result of daguerreotypy and of the daguerreotypist, Holgrave (221).
Critics have generally considered the brief mention of daguerreotypy in the story as little more than an early indication of what becomes, by 1851 in The House of the Seven Gables, Hawthorne's more mature interest in photography, represented in the person of Holgrave, the daguerreotypist/ hero.
From this last "abortive experiment," Aylmer demonstrates, almost in passing, his mastery of the technology known to readers in 1843 as daguerreotypy.
Holgrave's daguerreotypy in Gables is "associated with the involuntary disclosure"of guilt, suggesting Pyncheon's true nature.