damage tolerance


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damage tolerance

[′dam·ij ‚täl·ə·rəns]
(engineering)
The ability of a structure to maintain its load-carrying capability after exposure to a sudden increase in load.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Athena's subscale F-18 UAV, which will be used to demonstrate this Damage Tolerance technology later this year, was on display at the ceremony.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- Nature has produced exquisite composite materials--wood, bone, teeth, and shells, for example--that combine light weight and density with desirable mechanical properties such as stiffness, strength and damage tolerance.
Jacobs ESSSA, where he held the concurrent titles of Skill Lead and Damage Tolerance Subject Matter Expert.
Airware 2074, a high performance external fuselage sheet product offering a combination of low density and very high damage tolerance properties.
Once implemented on aircraft, UTC Aerospace Systems' electrothermal ice protection systems with CNT technology will deliver uniform heat distribution, enhanced damage tolerance, and improved fatigue resistance in a lightweight system.
Laminate-based aerospace damage tolerance criteria are also provided, such as open hole compression, compression after impact and barely visible impact damage.
18) Nuclar coercion will not succeed if the threatened state perceives its antagonist's damage tolerance to be extremely low and the defender can credibly deliver this level of punishment.
In this study, a composite laminate disk spring is designed, analyzed and fabricated to take advantage of the low specific strength and weight and high damage tolerance of composite laminates.
A main difference of CFRP-structures towards metallic ones is the behaviour regarding damage tolerance and fatigue.
As the jet accelerated, increasing stresses were put on the tire--it was just short of its damage tolerance when the pilot began the rotation maneuver, which momentarily unloaded the nose gear, transferring onto the main gear the airplane weight previously supported by the nose gear.
Aircraft designers using the new computer model will be able to explore the damage tolerance of alternative designs without building as many prototypes or conducting as many physical tests as are currently needed, he added.
The results, particularly the increased damage tolerance, could lead to the development of composite structures demonstrating the potential in future aircraft design for weight saving and environmental benefits such as reductions in CO2 emissions.