dance of death


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Death, Dance of,

or

danse macabre

(däns məkä`brə, –bər, dăns), originally a 14th-century morality poem. The poem was a dialogue between Death and representatives of all classes from the Pope down. By the 15th cent., pictorial representation with verses illustrating the pictures became common. The dance, in which Death as a skeleton or a corpse led his victims, was painted on walls of churchyards and cemeteries. The earliest known fully articulated example of the Dance of Death was a series of mural paintings (1424–25) in the cloisters of the Church of the Holy Innocents, Paris. The paintings were destroyed in 1669. In 1485, Guyot Marchand published a set of 17 woodcuts, with verses appended, based on the Paris murals; the set went through many editions and established its own genre. The best-known representations of the Dance of Death are the drawings of Holbein, the younger. Goethe wrote a ballad on the theme, Der Todtentanz, and in music Saint-Saëns used it in Danse macabre.

Bibliography

See facsimile of G. Marchand's Dance of Death (1945); H. Holbein, Dance of Death (1538, new ed. 1972); study by L. P. Kurtz (1934).


dance of death:

see Death, Dance ofDeath, Dance of,
or danse macabre
, originally a 14th-century morality poem. The poem was a dialogue between Death and representatives of all classes from the Pope down. By the 15th cent., pictorial representation with verses illustrating the pictures became common.
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.

Dance of Death

Holbein woodcut, one of many medieval examples of the death motif. [Eur. Culture: Bishop, 363-367]
See: Death
References in periodicals archive ?
Mackenzie too confidently discusses the origin of the Dance of Death in terms of medieval churchyard performance, a notion that seems here to go back to the speculations of Emile Male, but he plausibly sees the Massacre as a prime inheritor of this motif, if rather haphazardly in the way the characters appear onstage only to encounter their demise one after another.
He stands at the door to the dangerous domain of the Dance of Death, and whoever dares to enter had better be prepared for a terrifying tango.
Glissenti's own version of the Dance of Death in the fourteenth novella (in Book Three), not only radically laicizes the traditional scheme found in Marchant or Holbein, but also pitches the encounter between Death and his victims in a markedly professional framework.
Roger Smith's portrayal of Newton's tormented psyche is performed in the style of a ritualistic dance of death, reaching from the sublime to the grotesque of Newton's inner spirit.
Combe and Rowlandson also collaborated on The English Dance of Death (1815), which contains some of Combe's best verse, and The Dance of Life (1816-17).
Dance of Death (1901) features an aging couple long since locked in a suffocating stranglehold on each other.
Sehrai while paying painful tributes to Pulwama martyrs said the pain of losing loved ones can well be felt by the Kashmiris who see the dance of death every day.
Teale, 54, previously starred alongside Sir Ian in Dance Of Death, and his theatre accolades include the 1997 Tony Award for best actor for his role in A Doll's House.
GERMAN Europe and the Greek Government (with 79% support of the Greeks) are in a dance of death.
But Miss Chan is clever and Mr Statham is remorseless in a sharply choreographed dance of death on the streets of New York.
These were published in 1808-11 by Rudolph Ackermann, who directed much of Rowlandson's commissions including such masterpieces as Doctor Syntax and The English Dance of Death (Fig.
The dance of death in the Middle Ages; image, text, performance.