dancing devil

dancing devil

[¦dan·siŋ ‚dev·əl]
(meteorology)
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
But the moment Sancho quitted his beast to go and help Don Quixote, the dancing devil with the bladders jumped up on Dapple, and beating him with them, more by the fright and the noise than by the pain of the blows, made him fly across the fields towards the village where they were going to hold their festival.
Belingon was referring to Richard 'The Dancing Devil' Lasprilla, one of the original Filipino MMA fighters back in the day.
When John Kim Bell was explaining the theme of the show, he mentioned that, though there were dancing devils on stage, there are no devils in Aboriginal culture, but "what the hell, this is television" and he could do whatever he pleased.
Native Americans called them dancing devils. Some people today call them twisters.
However, according to The Yale Book of Quotations, one Edward Ward preceded Franklin, declaring: "Death and Taxes, they are certain," (The Dancing Devils, 1724).
Others added this year include the worship of the Hung kings of Pho Tho in Vietnam, the Buddhist chanting of Ladakh in India, the Dancing Devils of Corpus Christi from Venezuela and Klapa multipart singing from Dalmatia in Croatia.
Later, at the Edison, some of the dancing devils enjoying their temporary trip to Hades included NICOLE RICHIE, KIRSTEN DUNST, TOBEY MAGUIRE, STING, TOPHER GRACE, AND ALI LARTER.
The religious fiestas include the much-loved San Juan and Diablos Danzantes (Dancing Devils) and were historically intended for the worship of Catholic saints.