Dapper

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Dapper

lawyer’s clerk; swindled into believing himself perfect gambler. [Br. Lit.: The Alchemist]
See: Dupery
References in periodicals archive ?
Light of my life, my darling, I love you, I love you," the dapperly dressed quartet harmonized, handing Kim a flower and a card from her husband of 17 years, Kevin.
Not to be outdone, Snoop Dogg, normally a dapperly dressed rapper, decided to do his bit for silliness with a stetson.
The dapperly dressed All looked at her with almost angelic eyes and asked, "Pardon me, I couldn't hear you.
Baritone Gregory Dahl (Figaro), dressed dapperly in a brown, vested suit, his hair slicked back with a generous dollop of pomade, broke down the wall between the stage and the audience as soon as he appeared.
The pounds 2,000 shipping costs were met by the Walsall-based Union of Muslim Organisations, while estate agents Paul Dapperly donated pounds 500 for equipment and local firm Castle Packaging supplied bubble wrap to protect the equipment in the freight container.
So it's off to Moss Bros on Newcastle's Northumberland Street, where I'm met by the firm's elegant fashion advisor Diana White -head and a very dapperly dressed Chris Gipson, manager of the branch.
This neglects the dapperly attired handsomeness of Chase's comedy persona, though it still is a screen life filmmaker Robert Youngson characterized as "one long embarrassing moment.
Among its accomplishments were the founding of a Loan Society; a public library stocked with over five hundred books and subscribing to seven dailies and periodicals; a Pilgrims Fraternity that journeyed to Jerusalem on Jewish feast days; a Wayfarers Association to house passing travelers; a Volunteer Fireman's Brigade; and a brass band whose musicians were dapperly collegiate in their high collars, dark smoking jackets, and gleaming ensemble of tubas, trumpets, cornets, slide trombones, and French horns.
Dapperly dressed in a dark blue suit and carefully knotted purple tie, he was placed in the back of an unmarked car and driven to Runcorn police station.
Carroll sees all representations as ideologically constructed, and is particularly scathing in his deconstruction of Harman and his most celebrated construct, the dissembling rogue who begged both as Nicholas Genings, a counterfeit crank, and as Nicholas Blunt, a down-and-out but dapperly dressed hat-maker.