dark

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dark

(1) Not used. See dark fiber.

(2) Not running. Taken offline.

(3) Not lit. See darkened datacenter.
References in classic literature ?
Now they passed down the forest paths and hid in the tangle of the thickets at the head of the darksome glen, one on each side of the glen.
As we sat soberly drinking claret there with men of to-day, the spirits of the departed came in and took their places round the darksome board.
As she was uninformed respecting the exact locality of the place of business of Chicksey Veneering and Stobbles, but knew it to be near Mincing Lane, she directed herself to be driven to the corner of that darksome spot.
But, however that might be, Ariadne opened all the doors, and led him forth from the darksome prison into the pleasant moonlight.
Class Act Books' debut novel is The Son of Dark, Book 1 in the Darksome Thorn series by Jeremy Higley.
Must be compelled by signs and judgements dire: Frogs, lice, and flies must all his palace fill With loathed intrusion, and fill all the land; His cattle must of rot and murrain die; Botches and blains must all his flesh emboss, And all his people; thunder mixed with hail, Hail mixed with fire, must rend the Egyptian sky, And wheel on the earth, devouring where it rolls; What it devours not, herb, or fruit, or grain, A darksome cloud of locusts swarming down Must eat, and on the ground leave nothing green; Darkness must overshadow all his bounds, Palpable darkness, and blot out three days; Last, with one midnight-stroke, all the first-born Of Egypt must lie dead .
E'en the sombre bird of night Shuns it in her darksome flight, Startled by the piteous groan That arises from the stone.
Here lye the Sword that in the darksome Cave He drew, and swore by to be true to me, Thou shalt burne first, thy crime is worse then his; Here lye the garment which I cloath'd him in, When first he came on shoare, perish thou to: These letters, lines, and perjurd papers all, Shall burne to cinders in this percious flame.
To pass its threshold was to return to stagnation; to cross the silent hall, to ascent the darksome staircase, to seek my own lonely little room.
The critical description of the narrative supplied by the author in "The Custom-House" as wearing "a stern and sombre aspect; too much ungladdened by genial sunshine" and being written "while straying through the gloom of these sunless fantasies" (33) takes shape on the narrative landscape in the "melancholy brook" (144) flowing through the midst of "the darksome shade" (127) of a forest that "imaged not amiss the moral wilderness in which [Hester] had so long been wandering" (125).