data bank


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data bank

[′dad·ə ‚baŋk]
(computer science)
A complete collection of information such as contained in automated files, a library, or a set of computer disks.

Data Bank

 

(also data base), a collection of information sources on a certain subject equipped with a system for retrieving the sources. A data bank is set up after studying the information needs of the category of users that the bank is intended to serve. The functions of the data bank include the acquisition, processing, and storing of both published materials and unpublished scientific and technical documents, such as reports, plans, efficiency proposals, and manuscripts. The bank must be able to search the data in order to provide the required information. Data banks provide enterprises, organizations, and individual specialists with primary and secondary sources of information, as well as with factual information.

In the USSR, data banks are a necessary part of the nationwide system of scientific and technical information, and they are set up at all all-Union, republic, and territorial scientific and technical information agencies, at all central information agencies serving the various sectors of the national economy, and at enterprises, scientific research institutes, and design bureaus. The delineation of subject areas and the coordination of data services provided by data banks at different levels of the information service are carried out according to lists of headings of the data banks of all-Union, republic, and territorial scientific and technical information agencies and central information agencies serving the various sectors of the national economy.

I. M. MONASTYRSKII

data bank

Any electronic depository of data.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's also well-known that an adverse action report in the NPDB has a much more devastating effect on a physician's career than reports of malpractice verdicts or settlements posted in the data bank. The 2000 GAO report on the data bank noted: "Industry experts also agree, pointing out that disciplinary actions taken by health care providers and states are better indicators of professional competence than medical malpractice." (4)
It affirmed that the data bank would continue to be updated in the future in correspondence with the latest developments within the global oil industry.
We employed a quasi-experimental design to determine whether the National Practitioner Data Bank may have affected physician sanctioning by state licensing boards.
The HHS inspector general's report is not the first to note incomplete reporting to the data bank. A 2001 report by the same office documented that 84 percent of managed care organizations reported no adverse actions to the data bank between September 1990 and October 1999, concluding that the relatively small number they actually reported (715) constituted nonreporting.
In addition to the award, the judge in the case ordered that the report be removed from the data bank.
The data bank can and should be edited to suit the interests of the user.
The Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank (HIPDB) "is intended to help curtail fraud and abuse and to promote quality care," said Cynthia Grubbs, acting deputy director of the division of practitioner data banks at the Health Resources and Services Administration.
Many physicians are more familiar with the HIPDB's sister operation, the Nation al Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB), which collects information about medical malpractice judgments and settlements.
The company has exclusive access to the world's most comprehensive DNA and data bank, derived from the Eastern Finnish founder population.
AROUND 100,000 Scots are to be asked for blood samples for research which could lead to the creation of a national DNA data bank.
NIST has completed production of a new Protein Data Bank (PDB) CD-ROM set of the macromolecular structures of proteins and nucleic acids and the corresponding experimental data.
The reference samples used in FORDISC 2.0 are based on data recorded in the Forensic Data Bank (Jantz and Moore-Jansen 1988; Moore-Jansen et al.

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