data bits

data bits

The number of bits used to represent one character of data. When transmitting ASCII text via modem, either seven or eight bits may be used. Most other forms of data require eight bits.
References in periodicals archive ?
The transmitted bits other than data bits are often called "overhead." Typical numbers for overhead are 10% to more than 50% of the full number of bits transmitted.
Maximizing the storage capacity of hard drives requires storing smaller data bits. As the size of the data bits diminishes, so does the strength of their respective magnetic fields.
The data bits are 10 nanometers (billionths of a meter) wide and 40 nanometers apart.
The ramp-up characteristics must be measured to ensure that the burst ramps up quickly enough to guarantee data bits in the initial section of the burst are not corrupted.
The techniques used to recover erased and hard-to-read data bits depend on statistical analysis to fill in the gaps.
The settings to use for your modem software are: 8 Data Bits, No Parity, and 1 Stop Bit.
Other settings are: no parity, 8 data bits, one stop bit, full duplex and VT100/ANSI emulation.
The phone number for modem users is (716) 688-1552 (8 data bits, 1 stop bit, no parity, 300 to 16800 baud).
Communication settings are the usual eight data bits, one stop bit, and no parity.
The transmitter, in a system employing CRC coding, transmits data bits followed by parity check bits that are usually called CRC bits.
Although this technique overcomes the restrictions on consecutive-zeros-and-ones density, the maximum rate for customer data in the channel is limited to 56 kb/s (8,000 frames per second times seven customer data bits per frame) instead of the 64 kb/s that the channel is capable of.
The parity bit based CAM design is consisting of the original data segment and an extra one-bit segment, derived from the actual data bits. We only obtain the parity bit, i.e., odd or even number of "1"s as shown in fig 2.