data striping


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data striping

[′dad·ə ‚strīp·iŋ]
(computer science)

data striping

(storage)
Segmentation of logically sequential data, such as a single file, so that segments can be written to multiple physical devices (usually disk drives) in a round-robin fashion. This technique is useful if the processor is capable of reading or writing data faster than a single disk can supply or accept it. While data is being transferred from the first disk, the second disk can locate the next segment.

Data striping is used in some modern databases, such as Sybase, and in certain RAID devices under hardware control, such as IBM's RAMAC array subsystem (9304/9395).

Data striping is different from, and may be used in conjunction with, mirroring.

disk striping

The spreading of data over multiple disk drives to improve performance. Also known as "RAID 0," data are interleaved by bytes or blocks of bytes across the drives. For example, with four drives and a RAID controller that simultaneously reads and writes all drives, four times as much data is read or written in the same time frame as a system without striping. Disk striping does not provide fault tolerance but is often used in conjunction with disk mirroring (RAID 3 and RAID 5) to provide both speed and safety. See RAID 0, RAID 3, RAID 5 and RAID.

drive striping

The spreading of data over multiple disk or solid state drives (SSDs) to improve performance. Also known as "RAID 0," data are interleaved by bytes or blocks of bytes across the drives. For example, with four drives and a RAID controller that simultaneously reads and writes all drives, four times as much data is read or written in the same time frame as a system without striping. Drive striping does not provide fault tolerance but is often used in conjunction with drive mirroring (RAID 3 and RAID 5) to provide both speed and safety. See RAID 0, RAID 3, RAID 5 and RAID.
References in periodicals archive ?
IBM also made lots of smaller tweaks to AIX with Version 4.3.3, including support for Sun's NIS+ system management programs, a journal file system that now supports online backup as well as concurrent data mirroring and data striping on file systems, upgrded Sendmail, and tweaks to the kernel to improve web serving performance.