cell division

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cell division:

see cellcell,
in biology, the unit of structure and function of which all plants and animals are composed. The cell is the smallest unit in the living organism that is capable of integrating the essential life processes. There are many unicellular organisms, e.g.
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; mitosismitosis
, process of nuclear division in a living cell by which the carriers of hereditary information, or the chromosomes, are exactly replicated and the two copies distributed to identical daughter nuclei.
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; meiosismeiosis
, process of nuclear division in a living cell by which the number of chromosomes is reduced to half the original number. Meiosis occurs only in the process of gametogenesis, i.e., when the gametes, or sex cells (ovum and sperm), are being formed.
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cell division

[′sel di′vizh·ən]
(cell and molecular biology)
The process by which living cells multiply; may be mitotic or amitotic.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
They showed that the division of these stem cells is regulated at the final stage of replication, called cytokinesis, right before the two daughter cells separate.
Bellen's research team have discovered that the Arp2/3 complex and its activator WASp (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein) function in these daughter cells to transport Delta vesicles to the apical region of the daughter cells.
Caption: A young brain stem cell (shown dividing, top) packs old proteins (red) into a daughter cell. Older cells (one shown, bottom) lose a barrier that segregates these proteins.
The word "epigenetic" literally means "in addition in changes in generic sequence." The term has evolved to include any process that alters gene activity without changing the DNA sequence, and leads to modifications that can be transmitted to daughter cells (although experiments show that some epigenetic changes can be reversed).
Two cells are simultaneously injected into two capillaries, then lysed, before their contents are separated and detected under identical conditions "Daughter cells can be sampled for analysis at different times past division, thus allowing us to observe the development of asymmetry for the daughter cells, which were born identical in a symmetric division," says Krylov.
During early development, the following common features were apparent: (1) the first cell division produces prospective cells that generate the anterior peripheral region of the embryo; (2) the second cell division produces prospective cells that generate the posterior peripheral region plus the internal cells of the embryo; (3) in the lineage of prospective internal cells, several divisions ultimately result in cell death of one of the daughter cells. Early developmental processes are almost identical in the vermiform embryos of all four dicyemid genera.
2 HEALTHY DAUGHTERS Protein structures called kinetochores (red) are largely responsible for a crucial task: ensuring that each daughter cell produced when a cell divides in two ends up with a complete set of chromosomes.
Specifically, when cells in culture were first treated with ethanol, the subsequent exposure to bad cholesterol was without effect on cell division: Each daughter cell received the correct number of chromosomes.
coli bacteria dividing over hundreds of generations and confirmed that the sausage-shaped bacteria divided each time into daughter cells that grew elongated at different rates -- suggesting that one daughter cell was getting all or most of the cellular damage from its mother while the other was getting little or none.