decay product

(redirected from Daughter isotope)
Also found in: Medical.

decay product

[di′kā ‚prä·dəkt]
(nuclear physics)
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the process of producing its daughter isotope is a rigorous task it represents a high value in terms of availability.
Molybdenum-99 is the parent radioisotope obtained from uranium-235, and is used to produce the daughter isotope technetium-99m, which is used in many medical procedures.
Mo-99 generators for the production of Tc-99m sodium pertechnetate containing Mo-99 adsorbed on a pre-treated alumina column contained with the daughter isotope Tc-99m.
This daughter isotope can decay into another radioisotope, or the daughter isotope, that will continue the radioactive decay chain or decay into a stable element that ends the chain.
The time it takes for one-half of a parent isotope to decay to a daughter isotope is called a half-life.
Moreover, in a brief span of time, an insufficient amount of daughter isotope would be formed to permit its precise measurement.
Endress and his collaborators chose to study chromium-53, the daughter isotope of manganese-53, in carbonate fragments of the two CI chondrites known as Ivuna and Orgueil.
When this crust is subducted into the deep mantle, the uranium in it would decay, over a billion years, into significant accumulations of uranium's daughter isotope, lead-206.
It is caused by differential mobilisation (or precipitation) of uranium or its daughter isotopes from the deposition site or by a lack of time for the accumulation of the daughter isotopes to reach a state of equilibrium after the uranium has been deposited.
For this reason atoms have half-lives, which is the time it takes for half of whatever element it is to turn into other elements, called daughter isotopes. When one says that uranium-238 has a half-life of 4.4 billion years, it means that after that time half of it will have decayed into its daughter isotopes (mostly lead).