deadly nightshade


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deadly nightshade:

see belladonnabelladonna
or deadly nightshade,
poisonous perennial plant, Atropa belladona, of the nightshade family. Native to Europe and now grown in the United States, the plant has reddish, bell-shaped flowers and shiny black berries.
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; nightshadenightshade,
common name for the Solanaceae, a family of herbs, shrubs, and a few trees of warm regions, chiefly tropical America. Many are climbing or creeping types, and rank-smelling foliage is typical of many species.
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deadly nightshade

[¦ded·lē ′nīt‚shād]
(botany)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

deadly nightshade

a poisonous Eurasian solanaceous plant, Atropa belladonna, having dull purple bell-shaped flowers and small very poisonous black berries
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
All these myths came out of a belief that eggplants were dangerous because the vegetable had the great misfortune of being related to deadly nightshade. If you noticed the shared common names, popular opinion held that tomatoes also caused poisonous bouts of lust and mania.
Mae 'na nifer o enwau arno fo yn Saesneg hefyd gan gynnwys deadly nightshade, devil's berry a dwale.
It was confirmed as dried leaves of deadly nightshade.
* Belladonna (Deadly nightshade): Ear infections that come on suddenly with a high fever and dry, red face.
However, for the rest of Europe it was initially grown as an ornamental or curiosity plant and perceived by many to be poisonous, like other solanaceous plants: for instance, mandrake (Mandragora) and the deadly nightshade (Atropus belladonna), administered both as a hallucinogenic drug and a beautifier in various regions of Europe.
Common names include deadly nightshade, dwale, devil's berry, and poison cherry.
A) nettles B) deadly nightshade C) roses Call 0901 490 9022 (follow instructions) OR text MUM followed by a space, then your answer (A, B or C), name and address to 84080.
Atropine, a substance extracted from deadly nightshade which can stop muscular spasms, and P2S or pralidoxime mesilate, now used to treat insecticide poisoning, were, he believes, injected into his thigh.
This dereliction has led to poisonings such as that resulted from adulteration of Plantago lanceolata (plantain) with Digitalis lanata, eleuthero--formerly known by the misnomeric 'Siberian Ginseng' (Eleutherococcus senticosus)--with Periploca sepium (Chinese silk vine), and at least five innocuous herbs with deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna).
Aka "Patient Zero." The deadly nightshade of such fiction, produced to rationalize and naturalize the world's terror, darkens the glamour of Steven Gontarski's sculpture Prophet Zero I (all works 2003).
The top-priced filly (Danehill-L'On Vite) went for A$700,000, while the second highest reached A$625,000 (about pounds 263,000), and was a daughter of Deadly Nightshade (Night Shift-Dead Certain), who was trained by David Elsworth (for Michael Tabor and Sue Magnier) to finish second to Show Me The Money in the 1998 Group 3 Cornwallis Stakes.
* Overdose with an anticholinergic agent such as an antihistamine (for example, diphenhydramine), or an ingestion of an anticholinergic plant (such as deadly nightshade or Jimson weed) or an anticholinergic mushroom.