deaf


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to deaf: Deaf culture, Tone deaf

deaf

partially or totally unable to hear
www.drf.org
References in classic literature ?
He's that deaf he can't tell how much wind there is."
There is nothing like the fearful inclination of your tall spars overloaded with canvas to bring a deaf man and an angry one to their senses.
"Deaf!" said the hosier, with his great Flemish laugh.
You speak to him; he's deaf. And what does this Polyphemus do with his tongue?"
She's deaf as a post and we'll have to split our throats to make her hear at all.
There ought to be a law against anyone being as deaf as that."
'Was he deaf and dumb, woman?' asked the gentleman sternly.
'He was deaf, dumb, and blind, to all that was good and right, from his cradle.
As soon as the first effects were over, the injured, the deaf, and lastly, the crowd in general, woke up with frenzied cries.
One was a-smoking, and t'other one wanted a light; so they stopped right before me and the cigars lit up their faces and I see that the big one was the deaf and dumb Spaniard, by his white whiskers and the patch on his eye, and t'other one was a rusty, ragged-looking devil."
This Spaniard is not deaf and dumb; you've let that slip without intending it; you can't cover that up now.
Miss Miggs replied (still being profoundly deaf) that if Miss Haredale stood in the way at all, he might make himself quite easy on that score; as she had gathered, from what passed between Hugh and Mr Tappertit when they were last there, that she was to be removed alone (not by them, but by somebody else), to-morrow night.