death assemblage

death assemblage

[′deth ə‚sem·blij]
(paleontology)
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The Hell Creek, N.D., fossils represent "the first mass death assemblage of large organisms anyone has found" that sits at the K-Pg boundary, study author Robert DePalma said in a statement.
The aims of the study were to understand if the sampled death assemblage is descriptive of the original population, if it may be traced to a mass mortality episode.
Effect of a large larval settlement and catastrophic mortality on the ecologic record of the community in the death assemblage. Estuar.
This suggests that degradation and fragmentation patterns in the bay death assemblage would primarily be the result of physical and biological processes other than avian predation.
Encrustation, repair scars, and drill holes were rare in the entire death assemblage: 35 specimens with repair scars (2.9% of death assemblage), 17 specimens with either internal or external encrustation (1.2% of death assemblage), and 11 specimens with drill holes (<1.0% of death assemblage).
Here, geohistorical information derived from molluscan death assemblages is used to disentangle the effects of salinity and eutrophication on benthic community composition in Barnegat Bay to test the robustness of the conclusions drawn in the Taghon et al.
Death assemblages are the "dead remains sieved from the upper mixed-zone of the sedimentary column" (Kidwell 2007; p.
Field survey methods comprised visual examination of accumulated deposits of shell material (molluscan death assemblages) (Fig.
Many of the species found at Shelly Beach were recorded only as dead shells, either as part of death assemblages or as fresh shells on the strandline.
Shell fragments are very common in modern death assemblages (Tauber 1942; Hollmann 1968; Pilkey et al.
We have recently discovered two modern death assemblages containing dead Chrysemys picta (painted turtle), and with a view toward comparing these sites with fossil turtle death assemblages, we recorded position, orientation of the carapace (upside down or right-side up), presence or absence of non-shell elements and degree of shell disarticulation.
Moreover, Grill and Zuschin (2001) studied bivalve death assemblages in the Red Sea between shallow and deep settings.