death instinct


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

death instinct

[′deth ‚in‚stinkt]
(psychology)
In psychoanalytic theory, the unconscious drive which leads the individual toward dissolution and death, and which coexists with the life instinct.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the terms of my analysis, this means that once Balin has removed himself from civilization, the realm of Eros, the death instinct takes over.
Freud has it that instincts are never a conscious act and that we should not mistake the death instinct for the desire to die, and the life instinct for the desire to live.
The research attempts an interdisciplinary integrative approach of employing Freudianism, particularly the life and death instincts to interpret psychological facets of selected stories, and hermeneutic interpretation.
(14) Sugarman contends that, for Freud, the death instinct (Thanatos) functions in opposition to the life instincts (Eros).
They no longer fit neatly into his pleasure principal, engendering his controversial ideas about the death instinct. Van Haute, philosophical anthropology, U.
"What reason could she have," wonders Heyst, concerning Lena's decision to confront Ricardo, "Was it the promptings of some obscure instinct"; and indeed we could say that Lena's actions are motivated by the seemingly paradoxical death instinct which, however, is no less obscure than that of survival (Victory 294).
Cosgrove explains in an earlier chapter that she views stasis, particularly as it relates to Drach's Holocaust accounts, as "a manifestation of the Death Instinct in language and social order" (p.
Antigone herself has been declaring from the beginning: 'I am dead and I desire death.' When Antigone depicts herself as Niobe becoming petrified, what is she identifying herself with, if it isn't that inanimate condition in which Freud taught us to recognize the form in which the death instinct is manifested?
words, the subject's attempted sublimation of the death instinct
He walks the listener briskly through the life and evolving ideas of Freud, using, with definitions, the vocabulary that has insinuated itself into the popular lexicon: id, ego, and superego: narcissism, aggression, repression, paranoia, free association, transference and countertransference; unconscious and subconscious; sex, the death instinct, and dream interpretation.
Conversely, the death instinct originates with the birth of the human being and is an integral part of development, as has been pointed out by Freud (1926) and Klein (1945).
Thus Tim Dean in an invaluable essay on Queer Theory in the present volume shows that, in what is taken to be Foucault's most explicitly antipsychoanalytic text, History of Sexuality, Volume 1, at the very moment where he is elaborating the concept of "biopower," Foucault also invokes the "death instinct." Moreover, in his 1982 course at the College de France, Foucault explicitly acknowledged that only two twentieth century thinkers, Heidegger and Lacan, had anticipated his investigation of the subject's relation to truth.