deception

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deception

[di′sep·shən]
(electronics)
The deliberate radiation, reradiation, alteration, absorption, or reflection of electromagnetic energy in a manner intended to mislead an enemy in the interpretation of information received by his electronic systems.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Emmanuel was in fact temporarily convicted of wearing an article of police uniform in circumstances where it gives him an appearance so nearly resembling that of a member of a police force as to be calculated to deceive, of which was later overturned on appeal.
Some individuals ascribe to themselves the steps taken by Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev to deceive the country's people, Azerbaijani MP Siyavush Novruzov said on Feb.
Addressing a press conference in Islamabad on Thursday, he said that Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf's (PTI) coming into power is the biggest deceive of the country's 70 years history.
what a tangled web you weave when you endeavour to deceive and by golly have we the British tax payer been deceived by our politicians.
The consumer protection service stated that the information provided, or lack thereof, "deceived or was likely to deceive the average consumer as to the existence of those characteristics, leading or possibly leading to a transactional decision which a consumer would not have otherwise taken."
The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has warned the public against the spread of fake social media accounts bearing the agency's name that may be used to deceive Filipinos.
Judge "The law protects girls from men who prey upon them and flatter them and deceive them.
But one source quoted on NBC said: "There is absolutely unequivocal evidence they are trying to deceive the US."
A married couple were charged in the Magistrate's Court here today with masquerading as a 'Datuk Seri' and a 'Datin Seri' to deceive the police.
Practise to Deceive: Learning Curves of Military Deception Planners by Barton Whaley, edited by Susan Stratton Aykroyd.
Preaching at the service, he made what will be interpreted by some as a jibe at US President Donald Trump by contrasting the son of God with "populist leaders that deceive" their people.