deception


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deception

[di′sep·shən]
(electronics)
The deliberate radiation, reradiation, alteration, absorption, or reflection of electromagnetic energy in a manner intended to mislead an enemy in the interpretation of information received by his electronic systems.
References in classic literature ?
The whole cruelty of Sir Percival's deception had fallen on poor Lady Glyde.
The disgrace of lending herself to a vile deception is the only disgrace with which I can conscientiously charge Mrs.
Rubelle to Blackwater Park, it was his misfortune and not his fault, when that foreign person was base enough to assist a deception planned and carried out by the master of the house.
With Attivo Networks as part of its portfolio, Networks Unlimited will provide its customers the opportunity to leverage the best breed of deception technology as an additional layer of security to its critical infrastructure.
I begin by trying to show that there are resources unrelated to the morality of sex to distinguish between different sexual deceptions and then move to argue that deception does not always undermine consent.
A central assumption of Practise to Deceive is that the only tool that has a hope of "dispelling the fog of war" is intelligence--but it is the task of the deception planner to keep that fog thick.
A Guide To Deception shows: How to recognize lying eye contact; What a shoulder shrug really means; How someone feels when the cross their arms; What it means when a persons voice changes; That speech and body language must match; and so much more
There were 3,561 cases of deception in the first half of this year, an increase of 193 cases compared with the same period of last year.
Complete report on Deception Technology market spread across 112 pages, analyzing 5 major companies and providing 30 data exhibits is now available at http://www.
The book is divided into three in-depth case studies--the first two focusing on deception through blameshifting involving Franklin Roosevelt (World War II, a "high-opposition, high-deception" case) and Lyndon Johnson (the Vietnam War, a "medium opposition, medium-deception" case).
Rise in security spending by organizations and governments across the world in order to safeguard their networks and data centers against these cyber-attacks is anticipated to drive the market for the deception technology across the globe during 2016-2021.
Dynamic deception provides the real-time visibility into threats that have bypassed firewalls, intrusion detection and other prevention solutions, and provides the detailed forensics required to block, quarantine and remediate the infected device or network.