deck


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deck

1. Nautical any of various platforms built into a vessel
2. 
a. the horizontal platform that supports the turntable and pick-up of a record player
b. See tape deck
3. Chiefly US a pack of playing cards
4. Computing, obsolete a collection of punched cards relevant to a particular program
5. a raised wooden platform built in a garden to provide a seating area

Deck

Substrate over which roofing is applied. Usually plywood, wood boards, or planks.

Deck

 

a horizontal covering in the hull of a vessel, extending along the vessel’s entire length. Unlike a deck, a covering located over part of the length or width of a vessel is known as a platform. A ship’s hull may have one deck or several decks and platforms. The deck consists of plating, which consists, in turn, of deck plating proper and a deck stringer along the line where the deck joins the side of the ship, and the framing (beams, carlings, and so forth).

The upper deck provides the basic longitudinal bracing for the ship’s hull, giving the hull overall strength and lateral stiffness. The deck atop the watertight bulkheads is known as the main deck. The height of the main deck over the waterline is the measure of the vessel’s freeboard. The main deck may be the upper deck or, on ships with shelter decks or with continuous superstructures, it may be the second deck from the top. The upper deck accommodates cargo-handling gear on cargo vessels, staterooms on passenger ships, and armament on warships.

Lower decks are used on cargo vessels for dividing cargo space by height and for stowage of cargo. On passenger ships, the lower decks are used for staterooms, common rooms, and auxiliary spaces, and on commercial fish-processing vessels they contain processing equipment. The space between the upper and lower decks is called the tween deck, and the space below the lowest deck is called the hold. The openings in the upper deck (hatches) are framed with coamings and equipped with watertight covers. Decks over the superstructure are called supersructure decks. Partial decks over the main deck are distinguished by function; examples include boat decks and promenade decks. Deck thickness and deck framing dimensions for civilian vessels are regulated by the classification societies.

E. G. LOGVINOVICH

deck

[dek]
(computer science)
A set of punched cards.
(civil engineering)
A floor, usually of wood, without a roof.
The floor or roadway of a bridge.
(engineering)
A magnetic-tape transport mechanism.
(naval architecture)
Horizontal or cambered and sloping surfaces on a ship, corresponding to the floors of a building.

deck

1. The flooring of a building or other structure.
2. A flat open platform, as on a roof.
3. The structural surface to which a roof covering system is applied.
4. The top section of a mansard or curb roof when it is nearly flat.

deck

(1) The part of a magnetic tape unit that holds and moves the tape reels. The term may refer to any equipment that serves as a physical framework for electronic or mechanical devices. See rack. See also DEC.

(2) A component that is designed to provide a media source for an audio or video system. Decks do not have built-in amplification and speakers or a screen for display. Typical decks are VCRs and CD and DVD players or changers, which are often mounted in a stereo or home theater rack. When installed in a computer, CD-ROM and DVD players are called "drives" rather than decks. See rack.
References in classic literature ?
That I should be ground to death between the two was lost upon me as I saw the girl standing alone upon the tug's deck, as I saw the stern high in air and the bow rapidly settling for the final dive, as I saw death from which I could not save her clutching at the skirts of the woman I now knew all too well that I loved.
With spontaneity of admiration, Van Horn swept Jerry from the deck and gathered him into his arms.
The flier seemed intact except for the missing propellor and the fact that it had been carefully moored in the shelter of the clump of trees indicated that the girl had expected to return to it, while the dust and leaves upon its deck spoke of the long days, and even weeks, since she had landed.
He was a powerful as well as a resolute man, but he had come upon deck without weapons.
Then my head came above the deck and I saw Thurid, dagger in hand, leaping toward me.
As the Ghost rolled her side out of water, the boat was lifted snugly against her, and before the return roll came, we had heaved it in over the side and turned it bottom up on the deck.
Her eyes were widespread in an expression of horrified anticipation and fixed directly upon me as I came in sight above the edge of the deck.
Too high it was for him to reach it, but his teeth closed on the flowing black scarf and tore it to tatters as his weight drew him back to deck.
Now the cog's head was turned Francewards, and the shipman walked the deck, a peaceful master-mariner once more.
From the side glance he gives me when awake it seems as though he were annoyed at being interrupted in some arduous mental operation; and as I emerge on deck the ordered arrangement of the stars meets my eye, un- clouded, infinitely wearisome.
Tarzan had sought his deck chair, where he sat speculating on the numerous instances of human cruelty, selfishness, and spite that had fallen to his lot to witness since that day in the jungle four years since that his eyes had first fallen upon a human being other than himself--the sleek, black Kulonga, whose swift spear had that day found the vitals of Kala, the great she-ape, and robbed the youth, Tarzan, of the only mother he had ever known.
Something struck me on the back of the head, partially stunning me and knocking me to the deck.