declaration


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declaration

1. the ruling of a judge or court on a question of law, esp in the chancery division of the High Court
2. Law an unsworn statement of a witness admissible in evidence under certain conditions
3. Cricket the voluntary closure of an innings before all ten wickets have fallen
4. Contract bridge the final contract
5. Cards an announcement of points made after taking a trick, as in bezique

declaration

[‚dek·lə′rā·shən]
(computer science)

declaration

In programming, an instruction or statement that defines some type of program element (fields, variables, functions, arrays, etc.), as well as resources. Declarations do not generally create executable code. More often, they describe the structures in the program so that the compiler knows how to deal with them.
References in classic literature ?
There was thus no congeniality of principle between the Declaration of Independence and the Articles of Confederation.
not from the whole people of the whole Union--not from the Declaration of Independence--not from the people of the State itself.
In the Declaration of Independence, the enacting and constituent party dispensing and delegating sovereign power is the whole people of the United Colonies.
Each State is the constituent and enacting party, and the United States in Congress assembled the recipient of delegated power--and that power delegated with such a penurious and carking hand that it had more the aspect of a revocation of the Declaration of Independence than an instrument to carry it into effect.
Its incurable disease was an apostasy from the principles of the Declaration of Independence.
But in its construction the Convention immediately perceived that they must retrace their steps, and fall back from a league of friendship between sovereign States to the constituent sovereignty of the people; from power to right--from the irresponsible despotism of State sovereignty to the self-evident truths of the Declaration of Independence.
From the day of that Declaration, the constituent power of the people had never been called into action.
They soon perceived that the indispensably needed powers were such as no State government, no combination of them, was by the principles of the Declaration of Independence competent to bestow.
And thus was consummated the work commenced by the Declaration of Independence--a work in which the people of the North American Union, acting under the deepest sense of responsibility to the Supreme Ruler of the universe, had achieved the most transcendent act of power that social man in his mortal condition can perform--even that of dissolving the ties of allegiance by which he is bound to his country; of renouncing that country itself; of demolishing its government; of instituting another government; and of making for himself another country in its stead.
The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States are parts of one consistent whole, founded upon one and the same theory of government, then new in practice, though not as a theory, for it had been working itself into the mind of man for many ages, and had been especially expounded in the writings of Locke, though it had never before been adopted by a great nation in practice.
There is the Declaration of Independence, and there is the Constitution of the United States--let them speak for themselves.
He made Adrienne repeat her declarations, and even desired her to explain her precise parentage.

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