declarative statement

declarative statement

[di¦klar·əd·iv ′stāt·mənt]
(computer science)
Any program statement describing the data which will be used or identifying the memory locations which will be required. Also known as declaration.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some people read the headline as a declarative statement as if there was no question mark."I don't agree with the headline that the prayer breakfast was a prayer in futility," says Erick Wekesa, a prayer leader at Gospel Centres International who attended the event.
The poem hinges largely upon the declarative statement "I have got to know" in the first line, at once indicating that Longley has gotten to know this particular pool over the years or that his desire to "know" the pool has been frustrated but continues to consume him.
But all that appeared to have been nullified by Fashola's declarative statement.
No question mark, so I assume this is a declarative statement on your recent issue's cover ("Anti-Semitism on the Rise in America").
However, the OSCE Minsk Group, which is working to find a peaceful solution to the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict, has only made another declarative statement, "calling upon the sides of the conflict to cease military action." Spokesman for the Azerbaijani Foreign Ministry Hikmat Hajiyev noted that this Armenian aggression is nothing other than the act of vandalism and it once again proves the terrorist nature of the state of Armenia.
The decision to launch digital-first is a bold, declarative statement we are making on the future of publishing, and consistent with Vogue's long history of reinvention.
The first was the extent the respondent agreed with the statement; the second was the extent the respondent believed his or her advisor exhibited the behavior addressed by the declarative statement. The first aspect determines the perceived importance of the attribute, while the second aspect measures the perceived performance of the advising process.
I told my husband, "The car drop-off queue is totally flawed!" What I thought was a simple declarative statement did not resonate in that manner.
This, I now understand, is a simple declarative statement about the way muscles and tendons and nerves (oh, my!) work and do not work, regardless of the intentions of the body in which they dwell, and is devoid of any hint of what we currently call "spirituality."
Some authors write a purpose statement rather than a question, but it has the same components of phenomena, population, and specific gap in knowledge to be addressed, written as a declarative statement.
"Every month, analysts await a new set of data releases poised to make some declarative statement regarding where the economy is heading--every month, the clear path proves to be elusive once again, said Kuehl.
(Williams, CP I: 72) The first example, a construct, is a fairly straightforward declarative statement. The second example, from Williams' early poem "Tract," contains the same declarative statement, but now it is interrupted by a vocative ("my townspeople"), that is, by one of these constituents that tend to phrase separately from the rest of the syntax.