declination axis

declination axis

The axis at right angles to the polar axis about which a telescope on an equatorial mounting is turned in order to make adjustments in declination. The optical axis then follows a particular hour circle across the sky.

Declination Axis

 

one of the axes of an equatorial mount of a telescope. The declination axis is perpendicular to the polar axis. The telescope is rotated about the declination axis as it is directed to a given point on the celestial sphere.

declination axis

[‚dek·lə′nā·shən ‚ak·səs]
(engineering)
For an equatorial mounting of a telescope, an axis of rotation that is perpendicular to the polar axis and allows the telescope to be pointed at objects of different declinations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Taking a closer look at the mount, I saw that the declination axis was in need of repair.
The justification was that the declination axis could be much shorter than a large wormwheel would allow.
You'll also want a motor drive on the declination axis, and electronics that are suited to making very precise tracking corrections (called guiding) either manually or with an electronic autoguider.
The fight ascension axis rotates an equational fork that is mounted in the optical tube assembly, which contains the telescope mirrors and is positioned by the declination axis drive.
SAM also accepts every accessory available for the original Star Adventurer mount, including a Declination axis and counterweight.
Caption: The equatorial head can be separated into two pieces with the RA axis and polar base (left) weighing 26 pounds, and the declination axis (right) weighing 18 pounds.
Both RA and dec motors are housed within the declination axis, functioning as a built-in counterweight.
Remove the end caps from the VX's right ascension housing, turn the scope perpendicular to the mount's head to open up a hole in the declination axis, and then sight Polaris through the hollow polar bore.
The worm-gear drive on the mount's declination axis is spring loaded, giving it notably backlash-free operation, and this certainly contributed to my autoguiding success.
The drive mechanism for the declination axis has a slip clutch that retains the manual slow-motion feature, but there isn't a similar clutch for the polar-axis drive.
This reconciles any inherent "cone error" in the CGE mount, caused by the scope's optical axis not being exactly perpendicular to the declination axis.
First-time mechanical setup took me less than an hour, since it involves only connecting the mount to the pier with four hand knobs, threading on the stainless-steel counterweight shaft, and attaching the telescope-mounting plate to the top of the declination axis.