declivity


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declivity

[də′kliv·əd·ē]
(geology)
A slope descending downward from a point of reference.
A downward deviation from the horizontal.
References in periodicals archive ?
In general, river declivity in the plateau is 0.6 m/km while declivity on the plains varies from 0.1 to 0.3 m/km.
The opening of areas for grazing implied the deforestation of arboreal vegetation (Atlantic Forest) in areas of moderate declivity, and frequent fire use and the introduction of exotic grasses belonging to the genus Brachiaria in areas of Cerrado.
The definition of priority areas for both the implementation of soil conservation practices and forest restoration in the PPA was performed using information plans of land use and land cover (FIGURE 2a) and declivity (FIGURE 2b).
(2006), in southern Brazil a significant portion of family farming occupies areas of low agricultural ability and high environmental fragility as sharp declivity of slopes and shallow soils.
If you hunt bluff country or anywhere else with a decent amount of declivity in the terrain, you can find these spots.
Factors of large-scale variables such as altitude, declivity, and position of the stream in the basin can be reflected in differences in the composition and diversity of fishes.
As the plots had a fixed length (100cm), the height of the declivity (in cm) is equal to the percentage of the slope.
The climate of the region is classified as Am, according to Koppen's classification, with mean temperature of 27.9 [degrees]C, mean annual rainfall of 2500 mm and relative air humidity of 80%, and the area has predominance of dystrophic Yellow Latosol and declivity from 0 to 13%.
If the soil is impermeable, the oil will flow according to the surface's declivity (Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan [BTC], 2011).
Edinburgh, allegorized as a woman in the opening lines of the preface to their play The Tragic Mary (1890), fascinates the couple and draws them to her: "Beautiful for situation, happy in the way the light visits her, noble in natural outline, and favoured even in the rise and declivity of her streets, it is nevertheless as the repository of her Queen's tragedy that Edinburgh fascinates us to herself." (1) Michael Field's language of transport and suspension of volition as the city "fascinates" them and draws them toward its historically tragic queen are reminiscent of Walter Pater's description of the collective contagion of dramatic form and has traces of eighteenth-century sentimental language and moral philosophy.
I meandered into Mainz The abrupt declivity of emotions Juggled Autumnal images in my mind...