decoherence


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decoherence

[‚dē·kō′hir·əns]
(quantum mechanics)
The process whereby the quantum-mechanical state of any macroscopic system is rapidly correlated with that of its environment in such a way that no measurement on the system alone (without a simultaneous measurement of the complete state of the environment) can demonstrate any interference between two quantum states of the system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Namely, we plan to exploit the potential of cavity quantum electrodynamics in the bad emitter limit where decoherence is mostly due to the artificial atom.
Past estimates have suggested you'd need at least 50 qubits at low decoherence to accomplish that feat, so Google could well be within striking distance.
If the method can be experimentally demonstrated, it could give a quantum computers processor additional time so it can outpace decoherence, which threatens to make a computation fall apart before the qubits can finish their work.
Neutrino Induced Decoherence and Variation in Nuclear Decay Rates.
The main advantage of the photonic implementation of qubits is the robustness against decoherence and the availability of one-qubit operations.
Serge Haroche, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics back in 2012 for his work on atomic physics and proving quantum decoherence.
4) Decoherence concerns the interaction between the shadowy, uncertain, but rich-in-potentialities quantum level and the macro level, where only some of the potentialities at the quantum level are realized.
They can preserve superpositions for no longer than fractions of a second before they collapse in a process known as decoherence.
Svetlana Malinovskaya, Professor of Physics at Stevens Institute of Technology, presented her innovative work on ultracold dynamics and decoherence at the influential Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics (KITP).
Unfortunately, the quality of photons generated from solid-state qubits, including quantum dots, can be low due to decoherence mechanisms within the materials.
Decoherence normally happens so fast that observers cannot catch it in the act, but it occurs more slowly as temperatures decrease.