decoy

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decoy

Hunting
1. a bird or animal, or an image of one, used to lure game into a trap or within shooting range
2. an enclosed space or large trap, often with a wide funnelled entrance, into which game can be lured for capture
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

decoy

[′dē‚kȯi]
(ordnance)
An object with reflective characteristics of a target, used in radar deception.
Underwater device which reflects acoustic radiation, used by submarines in the deception of acoustic listening devices and acoustic homing torpedoes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

decoy

An object or action, such as a dummy installation, a flying aircraft, an unmanned aerial vehicle, or a raid, used to attract attention and draw enemy action away from the real target or military operation.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Then Prokopy modified the wooden decoys. He coated them with a concoction that included sugar and red latex paint, along with much smaller amounts of imidacloprid--an insecticide with low toxicity to mammals--than would normally be sprayed on trees.
Ingber, first examined how the decoys might impede the formation of blood clots.
"As the season progresses, we reduce the number of decoys in our spread and include motion on the water with the Mojo Butt Up Ripplers," Tussey recommends.
They're living decoys. Yes, too many does present can distract a buck that otherwise might have come to your decoy, but that's when a little calling and/or rattling can come in handy.
QUESTION I've enjoyed watching you guys decoy whitetails on Bowhunter TV, but I've never actually tried it myself.
His father worked at Wildfowler Decoys, based on Long Island, and was one of the first members of the Long Island Decoy Collectors Association.
For hunters of water fowl, apart from a gun, a dog, and warm clothes, one must-have element to a successful trip are decoys.
The main construction of the paper is that, firstly, the simulation model containing aircraft and surface-type IR decoys is established.
Many of the guides I know have an excellent success rate because of expert calling, their knowledge of goose behavior, and a good set of quality decoys. Costs vary, but obviously guided is more expensive than do-it-yourself.
They were ignoring decoys in traditional locations.
I have an affinity for decoys. Not for all the whizbang mechanical gadgets--spinning wing decoys haven't been deployed on hunts I'm in charge of for close to 10 years--but I do love a good-looking, well made decoy.