decrypt

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decrypt

[dē′kript]
(electronics)
To convert a crypotogram or series of electronic pulses into plain text by electronic means.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

decrypt

To convert secretly coded data (encrypted data) back into its original form. Contrast with encrypt. See plaintext and cryptography.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"It strikes me as odd that the court wasn't willing to split hairs when it comes to the distinction between decrypting and unlocking a phone, while they go to great lengths to explain how being compelled to unlock one's phone is not an issue of self-incrimination," he said.
settings is as infeasible as decrypting an encrypted drive without
The second step authenticates a registered user by decrypting the encrypted DIF with the user-input authentication data and compares it with the registered authentication data to authenticate the user.
Highly efficient if the data stored by owner is of the order of hundreds of gigabytes and the computing power of User is very small Cloud can also convert the complex task into simpler ones by partially decrypting it for authorized users.
The user accepted that he faced some problems while cracking the code and he was "decrypting half the URL" and knew that he "was on the right track."
Decrypting the payload will provide a better understanding of its overall objective and the nature of this threat," he concluded.
In this episode, President Martinez and his Chief of Staff charge the intelligence community with decrypting Thomas's satellite message.
Mair Eluned Russell-Jones worked at Bletchley Park, the main site for decrypting ciphers and codes, including those created by the German Enigma machine, for three years from 1942.
It was the main site for decrypting ciphers and codes, including those created by the German Enigma machine.
(7) By the time TORCH planning began, GCCS was also decrypting similar Vichy air force signals that described air assets available in North Africa.
The moniker itself is useless in decrypting data, of course; but it does point you to the key required for data restores.