deductible

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deductible

On a building project, a type of insurance policy stipulating that in the event of loss, the insured is liable for a specified initial amount and the insurance company is liable for the amount above that figure, up to the insured amount.
References in periodicals archive ?
While these changes did lead to the greater numbers of tax-qualified policies we see today, most LTCI customers still don't benefit much from increases in deductibility limits.
Many banks include such language whenever any mortgage loan product is advertised, whether or not the issues of LTV or tax deductibility are mentioned.
Double taxation takes a variety of forms - gas taxes, for instance, are paid with dollars upon which income taxes have already been paid, with no deductibility. Forty-two states have personal income taxes, and federal taxes are fully deductible in only three.
The emphasis of the proposed legislation on establishing a "cumulative profit" and requiring taxpayers to trace expenditures to a "source" of business or property income to ensure their deductibility raises a number of administrative and policy concerns.
This legislation increases the deductibility limit to 140% of current liability, allowing plans to save more for future retirees and avoid future funding shortfalls.
According to the groups, tax deductibility would promote Finland towards a true information society, as tax breaks could hasten the spread of broadband Internet accounts and further the utilisation of computers.
At the time, it looked like MI deductibility was on its way to becoming a reality.
Once deductibility limits have been surpassed, taxpayers should consider nondeductible contributions to a Roth IRA.
Camp has also been active in support of the tax deductibility of long-term care insurance, Medicare payment for dialysis service, the House prescription drug task force and many other proposals to help the elderly and disabled we serve."
The plan also may be opposed by organized labor and have IRS deductibility problems.
The concepts of risk shifting (the transfer of risk to a third party) and risk distribution (the sharing of risk among unrelated parties) defined how the IRS would question premium deductibility. Helvering has thus influenced every revenue ruling and captive court case since.
That's because popular provisions such as the deductibility for college tuition and an adjustment of the Alternative Minimum Tax rates, now set to expire mid-decade, will most likely be extended.