sedation

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sedation

1. a state of calm or reduced nervous activity
2. the administration of a sedative

sedation

[si′dā·shən]
(medicine)
A state of lessened activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Every animal achieved sufficient satisfactory sedation to perform a clinical evaluation and remained stable, without any signs of excitation or deep sedation.
Propofol-ketamine vs propofol-fentanyl combinations for deep sedation and analgesia in pediatric patients undergoing burn dressing changes.
In the current study, a comparison between the two drugs combination showed that, both KP and KD provided effective deep sedation and analgesia in tooth extraction for uncooperative anxious children.
2) conducted a review on the use of deep sedation by an anaesthetist in paediatric patients (<15 years) during 2009.
Deep sedation with sevoflurane inhalation via a nasal hood for brief dental procedures in pediatric patients.
Deep sedation achieved with lower dose of intravenous Xylazine administration made the application of gag and manual entry into oral and pharyngeal cavity easier.
Those who support deep sedation have affirmed that relief of suffering since the very beginning and on a continuous basis should be assured (6).
It is clear that many children in the dental chair may be at risk--in a situation where complications may not be detected early, and where there is a lack of appropriate knowledge and of drugs or equipment to reverse inappropriately deep sedation and ensure resuscitation.
For deep sedation, or general anesthesia, an anesthesiologist who's a physician (not a nurse) should always oversee your care, says Dr.
Radiographic (X-ray) evidence has a very poor correlation with clinical signs (either pain or dysfunction)," says the Winn Feline Health Foundation, noting that, unlike a blood test, X-rays often require deep sedation or general anesthesia of cats, which sometimes isn't advisable.
For patients being treated under minimal sedation, a dental assistant may, after training and when directed by a dentist, administer oral sedative agents or anxiolysis agents calculated and dispensed by a dentist under the direct supervision of a dentist; the rule also allows dental assistants to administer oral medications subject to specific conditions under the direct supervision of a dentist for patients being treated under moderate sedation and deep sedation.
Moderate to deep sedation was observed with 45 and 60 g/kg dose of medetomidine comparable with findings of Clark and England (1989).