deep-sea trench


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deep-sea trench

[¦dēp ¦sē ′trench]
(geology)
A long, narrow depression of the deep-sea floor having steep sides and containing the greatest ocean depths; formed by depression, to several kilometers' depth, of the high-velocity crustal layer and the mantle.
References in periodicals archive ?
At deep-sea trenches, the ocean crust plunged deep into the Earth's mantle triggering major earthquakes.
These plates converge at deep-sea trenches, plate boundaries where one plate sinks (subducts) below the other at so-called subduction zones.
Scientists today recognize distinct assemblages of animal species in six major seafloor regions (colored dots) along the system of volcanic mountains and deep-sea trenches that form the borders of Earth's tectonic plates.
Deep-sea trenches, which are subject to frequent catastrophic sediment slumping, have relatively low diversities.
(See Oceanus Winter 1992/93 for a discussion of "Island Arcs, Deep-Sea Trenches, and Back-Arc Basins.) Ocean drilling has provided fundamental information about colliding-plate processes, including accretion of sediments and volcanic edifices from underthrusting to overriding plates, emplacement of rocks that have been altered by the forces at work in colliding-plate zones, and the nature of continental collisions.