deep-water wave

deep-water wave

[′dēp ‚wȯd·ər ‚wāv]
(oceanography)
A surface wave whose length is less than twice the depth of the water. Also known as short wave.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The variation in space x and in time t of the surface elevation [zeta] in a narrow-banded deep-water wave group with the carrier frequency ft and the wave number [k.sub.0] can be presented at the leading order as
* Mid-ocean waves are considered deep-water waves, since the depth of the water they travel in is greater than half the distance between each wave crest.