defeat

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defeat

Law an annulment

Defeat

Appomattox Courthouse
scene of Lee’s surrender to Grant (1865). [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 22]
Armada, Spanish
defeat by English fleet marked Spain’s decline and England’s rise as a world power (1588). [Eur. Hist.: EB, 1: 521–522]
Austerlitz
defeat of Austro-Russian coalition by Napoleon (1805). [Fr. Hist.: Harbottle Battles, 23–24]
Bataan
Philippine peninsula where U.S. troops surrendered to Japanese (1942). [Am. Hist.: NCE, 245]
Battle of the Boyne
sealed Ireland’s fate as England’s vassal state (1690). [Br. Hist.: Harbottle Battles, 39]
Battle of the Bulge
final, futile German WWII offensive (1944–1945). [Eur. Hist.: Hitler, 1148–1153, 1154–1155]
Caudine Forks
mountain pass where Romans were humiliatingly defeated by the Samnites. [Rom. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 186]
Culloden
consolidated English supremacy; broke clan system (1746). [Br. Hist.: Harbottle Battles, 70]
Dien Bien Phu
Vietminh rout of French paved way for partition of Vietnam (1954). [Fr. Hist.: Van Doren, 541]
Gallipoli
poorly conceived and conducted battle ending in British disaster (1915). [Br. Hist.: Fuller, III, 240–261]
Little Bighorn
scene of General Ouster’s “last stand” (1876). [Am. Hist.: Van Doren, 274]
Pearl Harbor
Japan’s surprise attack destroys U.S. fleet (1941). [Am. Hist.: NCE, 2089]
Pyrrhic victory
a too costly victory; “Another such victory and we are lost.” [Rom. Hist.: “Asculum I” in Eggenburger, 30–31]
Salt River
up which losing political parties travel to oblivion. [Am. Slang: LLEI, I: 312]
Sedan
decisive German defeat of French (1870). [Fr. Hist.: Harbottle Battles, 225]
Stalingrad
German army succumbs to massive Soviet pincer movement (1942-1943). [Ger. Hist.: Fuller, III, 531–538]
Waterloo
British victory in Belgium signals end of Napoleon’s domination (1815). [Fr. Hist.: Harbottle Battles, 266]
white flag
a sign of surrender. [Western Folklore: Misc.]
References in periodicals archive ?
Mohamed Nazzal, a member of Hamas political bureau, strongly denounced the suspending, describing it as defeatist and immoral.
Kathmandu, May 10 -- Caretaker Prime Minister and Chairman of the UCPN (Maoist) Pushpa Kamal Dahal said on Saturday that his resignation was a "missile" targeted at national defeatists and meddlesome foreign forces.
I cant argue strongly enough against these defeatist attitudes which feed into the Taliban and Al-Qaeda propaganda that questions NATO and the United States staying power, Jawad said.
25 article, continued, "When the administration adopts a defeatist attitude on an issue that is at the top of our agenda, it becomes impossible for us to unite our movement on an issue such as Social Security privatization where there are already deep misgivings.
Given the depressing, defeatist history of Britain's railways over the last half-century and more, it is a most cheering sight to see the new Channel Tunnel rail link leap across the Medway, but the structure that carries it is scarcely distinguishable from, and no more inspiring than, the adjacent bridge that carries the M2.
For a Christian I don't believe there is ever a justification for becoming discouraged or taking on a defeatist attitude.
This is positive but not Panglossian, critical but never defeatist thinking.
I feel that is a defeatist attitude and will continue to search for work that makes me feel good about myself.
For progressives to get in a defeatist mindset after this election was won on the votes is simply wrong.
To exhume and display the trappings of a more radically engaged era, however imaginatively, is not the same as recapturing, much less rekindling, its spirit, and the general atmosphere of "Protest & Survive" was resolutely downbeat, if not exactly defeatist.
Addressing the first question a group in Falkirk wrote: `We drink too much alcohol, are both defeatist and creative.
While this reading successfully accounts for the defeatist stance of non-royalist poets Milton and Marvell, a larger question might still be raised as to how the vitalism of a Harvey and a Cavendish, both committed Royalists and polemists, may have served a conservative agenda which advocated a distanced yet still active central power.