defect


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defect

Crystallog a local deviation from regularity in the crystal lattice of a solid

Defect

In lumber, an irregularity occurring in or on wood that will tend to impair its strength, durability, or utility value.

defect

[′dē‚fekt]
(science and technology)
An irregularity that spoils the appearance or impairs the usefulness or effectiveness of an object or a material by causing weakness or failure.

defect

In wood, a fault that may reduce its durability, usefulness, or strength.

defect

References in classic literature ?
Money and fine clothes could not mend these defects or cover them up; they only made them more glaring and the more pathetic.
By these considerations I was induced to seek some other method which would comprise the advantages of the three and be exempt from their defects.
In this way I believed that I could borrow all that was best both in geometrical analysis and in algebra, and correct all the defects of the one by help of the other.
It is true, as has been before observed that facts, too stubborn to be resisted, have produced a species of general assent to the abstract proposition that there exist material defects in our national system; but the usefulness of the concession, on the part of the old adversaries of federal measures, is destroyed by a strenuous opposition to a remedy, upon the only principles that can give it a chance of success.
Typically, hospital-based estimates cannot determine the geographic region in which patients reside, nor can they indicate who would seek care for a major defect at a particular health-care facility.
Detailed within is a NDT method that predicts the structural quality of a casting rather than simply scanning for indications of a defect.
Once oncologic resection is completed, reconstruction is based on the size, depth, and location of the defect.
Every year, approximately 3%-6% of infants worldwide are born with a serious birth defect (1-5).
Opposing statements such as "50 to 80% of the end-of-the-line defect can be directly contributed to print defect" and "print defects can't be tied to any end-of-the-line defect reliably" are prevalent.
A 27-gauge needle was used to inject the implant into the subcutaneous tissues or into a subperiosteal plane at the nasal defect.
Testing showed that the defect was composed of an alloy of cobalt, chromium and molybdenum, embedded in a silicone matrix.