defect scattering

defect scattering

[di′fekt skad·ər·iŋ]
(solid-state physics)
Scattering of particles or electromagnetic radiation by crystal defects.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the earliest, Klemens and other researchers obtained the frequency-dependent phonon relaxation time mostly by long-wave approximation (LWA) and Deybe model: Klemens obtained the phonon relaxation times by Umklapp (U) three-phonon scattering [33, 34] and defect scattering [35], Herring studied normal (N) three-phonon scattering [36], Holland extended the results to dispersive transverse mode range [37], and Casimir studied boundary scattering [3840].
Understanding of the role of defects will therefore be important to improve the transport performances of organic field-effect transistors in spite of increases in defect scattering.
In the case of temperatures at or above room temperature, the mobility decreases with increasing temperature, which indicates that defect scattering is a more dominant effect as temperature increases [9].