defect

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Related to defects: latent defects

defect

Crystallog a local deviation from regularity in the crystal lattice of a solid

Defect

In lumber, an irregularity occurring in or on wood that will tend to impair its strength, durability, or utility value.

defect

[′dē‚fekt]
(science and technology)
An irregularity that spoils the appearance or impairs the usefulness or effectiveness of an object or a material by causing weakness or failure.

defect

In wood, a fault that may reduce its durability, usefulness, or strength.

defect

References in classic literature ?
The defect turned out to be the one already spoken of-- two stories in one, a farce and a tragedy.
In this way I believed that I could borrow all that was best both in geometrical analysis and in algebra, and correct all the defects of the one by help of the other.
Enough of the Lacedaemonian government; for these seem the chief defects in it.
Everyone had some defect, of body or of mind: he thought of all the people he had known (the whole world was like a sick-house, and there was no rhyme or reason in it), he saw a long procession, deformed in body and warped in mind, some with illness of the flesh, weak hearts or weak lungs, and some with illness of the spirit, languor of will, or a craving for liquor.
Birth defects can affect an infant regardless of birthplace, race, or ethnicity.
Do solder paste printing defects affect end-of-the-line defects?
Subtle defects of only a few millimeters can mean the difference between a satisfied and unsatisfied patient.
A reference spectrum was acquired of a silicone region where there were no defects.
We review the literature to identify genetic defects involved in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, particularly defects in iodide transport from circulation into the thyroid cell, defects in iodide transport from the thyroid cell to the follicular lumen (Pendred syndrome), and defects of iodide organification.
Scientists have found new evidence that prenatal exposure to air pollution may cause congenital heart defects.
However, films of interest are seldom perfectly uniform, and meas-ured line width reflects both the damping and the defects in the sample.