defence


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defence

(US), defense
1. Law a defendant's denial of the truth of the allegations or charge against him
2. Law the defendant and his legal advisers collectively
3. American football
a. the team that does not have possession of the ball
b. the members of a team that play in such circumstances
4. Psychoanal See defence mechanism
References in classic literature ?
The Apology or Platonic defence of Socrates is divided into three parts:
Few persons will be found to wish that Socrates should have defended himself otherwise,'--if, as we must add, his defence was that with which Plato has provided him.
Yet the defence, when taken out of this ironical form, is doubtless sound: that his teaching had nothing to do with their evil lives.
Here again, as in the former instance, the defence of Socrates is untrue practically, but may be true in some ideal or transcendental sense.
But such a defence as would be acceptable to his judges and might procure an acquittal, it is not in his nature to make.
Nor are the reasonings of Schleiermacher, who argues that the Platonic defence is an exact or nearly exact reproduction of the words of Socrates, partly because Plato would not have been guilty of the impiety of altering them, and also because many points of the defence might have been improved and strengthened, at all more conclusive.
It was not, however, by clamour that the contest was to be decided, and the desperate efforts of the assailants were met by an equally vigorous defence on the part of the besieged.
I am, indeed,'' said Rebecca, ``sprung from a race whose courage was distinguished in the defence of their own land, but who warred not, even while yet a nation, save at the command of the Deity, or in defending their country from oppression.
Those who advance first bear huge shields and defences made of plank; the others follow, bending their bows as they come on.
If her defence fails, then, my dear friend, like other persons who are enamoured of something, but put a restraint upon themselves when they think their desires are opposed to their interests, so too must we after the manner of lovers give her up, though not without a struggle.
the same information had been conveyed to him in the same terms, at least fifty times before), Mr Willet arose from table, walked round to Joe, felt his empty sleeve all the way up, from the cuff, to where the stump of his arm remained; shook his hand; lighted his pipe at the fire, took a long whiff, walked to the door, turned round once when he had reached it, wiped his left eye with the back of his forefinger, and said, in a faltering voice: 'My son's arm-- was took off--at the defence of the--Salwanners--in America--where the war is'--with which words he withdrew, and returned no more that night.
There were many men of talent who said what they could in defence of the king's tyrannical proceedings," replied Grandfather.