deflation

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deflation:

see inflationinflation,
in economics, persistent and relatively large increase in the general price level of goods and services. Its opposite is deflation, a process of generally declining prices. The U.S.
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deflation

(ECONOMICS) a decrease over time in the general level of prices, coupled with an overall reduction in the level of economic activity, new investment, etc. (compare INFLATION). In modern capitalist economies, in which inflation tends to be endemic, deflation is usually relative rather than absolute, involving a reduction in rates of price increase rather than an absolute decrease in prices.

Deflation

 

the decrease of monetary volume by means of the withdrawal from circulation of excess paper money. Deflation often precedes monetary reforms. Since World War II deflation has most often been encountered as part of the so-called deflation policy of capitalist states, which aims at stopping or decreasing the rates of growth of monetary volume and commodity prices. Deflation is realized through limitation of credits (an increase in the rate of interest, imposition of credit limits), higher taxes, reduction of expenditures for social and cultural needs, a “freeze” on wages and salaries, and other measures carried out by capitalist states. These measures result in a lowering of the rate of economic development, a deterioration in the living conditions of the toiling masses, and an intensification of the class struggle.


Deflation

 

the disintegration of rocks and soils owing to wind action, accompanied by the removal and wearing away of the broken particles. Deflation is particularly strong in those parts of deserts from which dominant winds blow (for example, in the southern part of the Karakumy desert). The processes of deflation and physical weathering result in the formation of eroded cliffs with unusual shapes, such as towers, columns, and obelisks.

deflation

[di′flā·shən]
(geology)
The sweeping erosive action of the wind over the ground.

deflation

1. Economics a reduction in the level of total spending and economic activity resulting in lower levels of output, employment, investment, trade, profits, and prices
2. Geology the removal of loose rock material, sand, and dust by the wind
References in periodicals archive ?
So, one important kind of disagreement between deflationists and inflationists about truth will be over the status of the assumptions used in deflationary derivations of problematic generalizations about truth.
Until there is some indication of how the facts about entailment and material implication are to be explained without appeal to truth, inflationists are right to insist that deflationists are not entitled to such premises for explaining facts about truth.
Nonetheless, whether interpreted as a warranted-assertibility theory of truth, or a deflationist, appraisal account rooted in a linguistic ability or technique to endorse legal propositions as justified by the forms of argument, the justificatory aspect of Patterson's view is, at least initially, plausible.
be invoked by a deflationist in formulating deflationism or in
The problem is nothing new, but its importance seems not to have been sufficiently appreciated by deflationists.(17) And it can be appreciated simply by examining obvious facts about the English language.
We cannot capture that by speaking of truth in deflationist terms, without referring to occasions for describing, much less saying how what truth is makes them work in fixing standards.
Rather, deflationists think that no one has yet given a good reason why we need any substantive notion of truth.
Deflationists about meaning-that and believing-that think that such disquotational notions of expressing are the only legitimate ones; inflationists disagree.
Many philosophers believe that a deflationist theory of truth must conservatively extend any base theory to which it is added (roughly, talking about truth should not allow us to establish any new claims about subject-matters not involving truth).
Now, as a deflationist about truth, I'm more than happy to set metaphysicalism aside.
There is an incompatibility between the deflationist approach to truth, which makes truth transparent on the basis of an antecedent grasp of meaning, and the traditional endeavour, exemplified by Davidson, to explicate meaning through truth.