defoliate


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defoliate

(of a plant) having shed its leaves

defoliate

[dē′fō·lē‚āt]
(botany)
To remove leaves or cause leaves to fall, especially prematurely.
References in periodicals archive ?
These insects undergo seemingly unpredictable population booms and can defoliate whole forests.
At the same time, it's worth using one of the modern safe insecticides to control the sawfly which will often defoliate your gooseberries.
Goldwater had surely earned his reputation as a gunslinger with his proposal to use tactical nukes to defoliate Vietnam, his repeated calls to give NATO armies the right to use atomic weapons on their own, and his constant refrain that U.
The larvae eat the needles and may defoliate most of one branch, but birds eat the larvae before they mature.
Their studies show that as caterpillars defoliate a tree, the quantity and structure of the tannin in the leaves changes, becoming more deadly to the virus.
Rose slugs occasionally defoliate the plant (it has never been sprayed), but the plant immediately refoliates and continues in bloom.
The Hawthorn Moth is unusual in these parts and its appearance should be welcomed, even if it does defoliate a few trees.
Gypsy moth larvae, considered a pest by the ODA's Insect Pest Prevention and Management Program, defoliate trees and other plants.
Acid rain was going to defoliate the land and starve us.
Is anyone with any knowledge of the wars in Laos and Cambodia really surprised a military which was able to defoliate vast tracts of Vietnam with Agent Orange and which is of course now even more technologically advanced, hasn't dealt massive blows to poppy cultivation or that there have been record harvests in recent years?
Armyworms (Spodoptera frugiperda) defoliate a wide range of crops, causing extensive damage and economic loss.