Degas


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Degas

Hilaire Germain Edgar . 1834-- 1917, French impressionist painter and sculptor, noted for his brilliant draughtsmanship and ability to convey movement, esp in his studies of horse racing and ballet dancers

degas

[dē′gas]
(electronics)
To drive out and exhaust the gases occluded in the internal parts of an electron tube or other gastight apparatus, generally by heating during evacuation.
(engineering)
To remove gas from a liquid or solid.
References in periodicals archive ?
She turns our modern gaze toward the intersections of the art world, the bourgeoisie, and those living in poverty in Paris two centuries ago and challenges the reader to balance questions about the wealth divide, social justice, and what an artist's role is in articulating "the weight of the real." She ultimately doesn't force any conclusions, making this an attractive work of nonfiction that will leave the reader with a more intimate vantage point into the lives of both Degas and the immortalized Marie.
This exploration of a work Degas never intended to endure reveals how an instant frozen in time can yield perennial questions.
AESTHETICS: Degas was inspired by Japanese prints, which led him to explore asymmetrical compositions and unusual points of view.
Degas majored in classics and music at his secondary school, where is also discovered his love for painting and art.
Degas was born in Paris in 1834 and is credited as being one of the founders of Impressionism, the 19th century art movement that is characterized by small thin brush strokes used to portray the visual impression of the moving effect of light and color.
For Sickert, who saw the painting in London in 1922, it offered 'a useful instance of a procedure of black and white dead-colour', but comparison between the smeared, inchoate brushwork and a group of contemporary monotypes--some of his earliest experiments in 'greasy ink' printing --also points to aesthetic affinities that exemplify Degas's tendency to maintain a degree of technical fluidity between the different media in which he worked.
Just as it is often said that Fred Astaire gave Ginger Rogers class and she gave him sex appeal, Degas's interest in Cassatt gave her sometimes cloying canvases an edge, while her interest in Degas made him seem like less of a boor; even male critics felt his work bordered on misogyny.
Although in total the works reveal a number of significant ideas about Degas' self-conception, it is actually plate seventeen (Fig.
The owner said it is Degas' pastel on paper, titled Dancer Adjusting Her Shoe, approximately 47cm by 61cm in size and dated late 19th century.
30, and stop by the National Gallery of Art, where the original sculpture will be the centerpiece of a Degas exhibition.
Meanwhile, the Degas artwork, the only one of his pieces to feature two figures, was bequeathed to the nation by artist Lucien Freud on his death in 2011.
Freud chose to donate four works of art, including three bronze sculptures by Degas and a painting by French artist Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot, from his personal collection to the nation to satisfy an inheritance tax bill of PS2,340,000.