Degradation

(redirected from degradative)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

degradation

[‚deg·rə′dā·shən]
(computer science)
Condition under which a computer operates when some area of memory or some units of peripheral equipment are not available to the user.
(geology)
The wearing down of the land surface by processes of erosion and weathering.
(hydrology)
Lowering of a stream bed.
Shrinkage or disappearance of permafrost.
(organic chemistry)
Conversion of an organic compound to one containing a smaller number of carbon atoms.
(physics)
Loss of energy of a particle, such as a neutron or photon, through a collision.
(thermodynamics)
The conversion of energy into forms that are increasingly difficult to convert into work, resulting from the general tendency of entropy to increase.

Degradation

A loss of the original characteristics, or weakening of an element by erosion; a disintegration of paint by heat, moisture, sunlight or natural weathering. Also harmful action caused by human activity, such as vandalism.

Degradation

 

in biology, the simplification in structure and function of animals or plants under the influence of conditions of existence that have altered. Distinction is made between ontogenetic degradation—that is, simplification of the organism in the final stages of its development as compared with the initial stages—and phylogenetic degradation, or simplification of the structure of descendants as compared with the organization of their ancestors.

degradation

Disintegration of a paint film by heat, moisture, sunlight, or natural causes.
References in periodicals archive ?
At longer degradation times, greater degradative breakdown activity can then occur in the crystalline regions of the different systems indicated.
The bacteria Halomonas and haloarchaea survive in similar salinities and contain similar degradative capabilities [4]; however, it is not known what drives the competitive advantage of one over the other.
Despite differences in degradative ability, both fungi produced similar amounts of ergosterol, a proxy for total fugal biomass [22], as well as similar amounts of secreted protein on sorghum when compared at equivalent timepoints.
To further distinguish whether RBBR decolourisation by isolate MS8 was by means of degradative colour removal or by adsorption, dye decolourisation was reported in absorbance ratio of [A.sub.592]/[A.sub.500] and possible dye adsorption onto fungal mycelium was also quantified after methanol extraction.
The basic condition applied on the active drug substances for 2 hours induced the hydrolysis of florfenicol causing assay loss of about 26% and degradative materials (Fr1) and (Fr2) of about 23% and 4.5%, respectively, while no degradation was observed for flunixin.
This research demonstrates the importance of inoculum source on the electrogenic and degradative activities and ultimate microbial community composition of SW-treating MFCs.
During fruit ripening, degradation in a chlorophyll is generally more intense than in b chlorophyll, since b chlorophyll has to be converted to a chlorophyll to enter the degradative route (MATILE et al., 1996).
Strains ZP-FP5 and ZP-F6 exhibited maximum pectin degradative properties by producing zones of 45 and 40 mm sizes respectively as shown in Figure 2.
(19) Continued presence of bacteria causes influx and activation of neutrophils, thus lifting the level of degradative matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs).
An animal study of sea cucumber extract (SCE), DHGs, showed that it undergoes observable metabolic degradation when administered orally and loss of sulfate group as the most important degradative metabolic pathway; only 0.1% of the orally administered DHG (50 mg/kg) was recovered in urine collected for 24 h while more than 5% of the intravenously administered DHG (1 mg/kg) was excreted in urine in 24 h.
It is generally accepted that the age-related accumulation of "aberrant" proteins results from both the increased occurrence of damage and the decreased efficiency of degradative systems.