degree of enrichment

degree of enrichment

[di′grē əv en′rich·mənt]
(nucleonics)
The enrichment factor minus 1.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, Enrichment Factor (EF) analysis showed lowest degree of enrichment for Cr while highest degree of enrichment for Ag and Cd.
Central to calculations about centrifuges is their efficiency, usually measured in terms of separative work units (SWUs), which relate to both the amount of material processed and the degree of enrichment reached.
The geochemical parameters of REEs can reflect their characteristics, representing the degree of enrichment and source.
Enrichment is not negotiable, but the details including site, level and degree of enrichment can be discussed between the two sides, Araqchi said.
[K.sub.SEF] values of Cu, Cr, and Pb are greater than zero and had a certain degree of enrichment. Pb is more significant, corresponding to its EF value.
Iran needs this degree of enrichment for its medical research reactor, which can produce isotopes for cancer treatment.
Allele enrichment also depended on the extension temperature relative to the probe element [T.sub.m], with lower extension temperatures showing a greater degree of enrichment (data not shown).
Wheatgerm bread often has slightly more zinc than wholemeal, depending on the degree of enrichment with wheatgerm.
The threshold, now even closer given the recent disclosures regarding the degree of enrichment reached at the Fordow plant (well beyond 20%), would not alleviate Israeli security concerns and might tip the balance in Israeli assessments over the costs and benefits of a military operation against nuclear sites in Iran.