dehiscence

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dehiscence

[də′his·əns]
(botany)
Spontaneous bursting open of a mature plant structure, such as fruit, anther, or sporangium, to discharge its contents.
(medicine)
A defect in the boundary of a bony canal or cavity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Alveolar bone dehiscences and fenestrations: an anatomical study and review.
Superior semicircular canal dehiscence (SSCD), initially reported by Minor et al.
Azinovic, "Incidence and distribution of dehiscences and fenestrations on human skulls," Collegium Antropologicum, vol.
Politzer was the first person to describe facial canal dehiscence (FCD) in 1894.
(1) Though data are varied, the mode of hysterectomy does have an impact on the risk of dehiscence.
Thus, the aim of this paper is to evaluate the prevalence, distribution and severity of dehiscences that occur naturally in humans by improving the method of dehiscence identification through CBCT and making a classification of dehiscences using a novel system based on the findings.
[2] Facial nerve dehiscence (FND) is a common anatomic variant that usually occurs in the tympanic segment above the oval window but is also encountered at the level of the geniculate ganglion and in the mastoid segment adjacent to the retro facial cells.
In summary, their experience reports an alternative, single-stage technique of debridement, internal fixation of the sternum, pectoralis major musculocutaneous advancement flaps, and primary closure used in patients with sternal dehiscence following median sternotomy.
(5) In a recent study of 131 consecutive pediatric patients undergoing HRCT of the temporal bones, 4% of patients demonstrated findings of semicircular canal dehiscence, with the superior canal being dehiscent three times more often than the posterior canal.
Cuff dehiscence rates consistently are reported to be lower for vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy than for laparoscopic and robotic hysterectomy.
The jaundiced patient may experience prolonged healing and risk for wound dehiscence, which is related to a pro-inflammatory state resulting from portal and systemic endotoxemia.
The findings of the study which included 48 cases of wound dehiscence, suggest that if a physician wants to choose a Pfannenstiel incision, it should be for cosmetic or other reasons, not because it is going to be stronger, study investigator Dr.